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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New York Information Technology Center

55 Broad St

 

—Exploring Lower Manhattan —

 
New York Information Technology Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2011
1. New York Information Technology Center Marker
Inscription.
This 1960s American office building has been ripped apart and rewired with a 21st-century communications infrastructure that can instantly connect its tenants with sites around the world. Famous in the 1980s as the high finance offices of investment bankers Drexel Burnham Lambert, 55 Broad Street was reborn in 1996 as the Downtown headquarters of Silicon Alley – the dazzlingly hip computer / new media industry stretching along Broadway from 23rd Street down through the financial district.

The new media, on-line services, and software companies relocating here are devoted to the proposition that communications technology eliminates the significance of time and distance – allowing us to do business with the world from the remotest mountain top. Yet these very companies cluster here in the heart of Downtown for human warmth, commonality of interests, and deal-cementing, real-world handshakes – traditional Downtown values.
 
Erected by The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 42.312′ N, 74° 0.687′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Broad Street and Beaver Street, on the right when traveling north on Broad Street. Touch for map
New York Information Technology Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2011
2. New York Information Technology Center Marker
. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Marinus Willett (a few steps from this marker); Adriaen van der Donck’s Home (within shouting distance of this marker); 13 South William Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Delmonico's Building (about 400 feet away); Lord’s Canal (about 400 feet away); Stone Street Historic District and Colonial New York Street Plan (about 400 feet away); Asser Levy’s Home (about 400 feet away); Dutch Hoog Straat (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. At the upper right of the marker is a picture illustrating the information highway, which the caption says it “is lit by pulses of light flashing through glass fiber cables. Fiber optics transmit data over longer distances and with far greater speed than electricity sent through traditional wiring.” Below this is a picture of telephone poles with multiple levels of old copper wire with the caption “Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated his telephone in 1877. Within three years the streets of Downtown had sprouted a tangle of telephone and telegraph wires strung from wooden poles.”
Photos
Marker in Lower Manhattan image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2011
3. Marker in Lower Manhattan
on the left of the marker have a caption of “A Western Union boy (top left), photographed by Jacob Riis, circa 1890. Wall Street has always lived and died on communications, from bicycle messengers, to telephone and telegraph, to ticker-tape, to electronic read-outs, to fax machines, to the internet, to subterranean systems (bottom left) of pneumatic tubes.”
 
Categories. Communications
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 431 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 16, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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