Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chicago in Cook County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Site of the Haymarket Tragedy

 
 
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #1 image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
1. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #1
Inscription. (plaque 1)
On the evening of May 4th, 1886, a tragedy of international significance unfolded on this site in Chicago’s Haymarket produce district. An outdoor meeting had been hastily organized by anarchist activists to protest the violent death of workers during a labor lockout the previous day in another area of the city. Spectators gathered in the street as speakers addressed political, social, and labor issues from atop a wagon that stood at the location of this monument. When approximately 175 policemen approached with an order to disperse the meeting, a dynamite bomb was thrown into their ranks.

(plaque 2)
The identity and affiliation of the person who threw the bomb have never been determined, but his anonymous act had many victims. From the blast and panic that followed, seven policemen and at least four civilian bystanders lost their lives, but victims of the incident were not limited to those who died as a direct result of the bombing. In the aftermath, the people who organized and spoke at the meeting, and others who held unpopular political viewpoints were arrested and unfairly tried, even though none could be tied to the bombing itself.

(plaque 3)
Meeting organizers George Engel and Adolph Fischer, along with speakers August Spies and Albert Parsons were put to death
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #2 image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
2. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #2
by hanging. Activist Louis Lingg died violently in jail prior to his scheduled execution. Meeting speaker Samuel Fielden, and Oscar Neebe and Michael Schwab were sentenced to prison, but later pardoned in 1893 by Illinois Governor John Peter Altgeld, citing the injustices of their trial.

(plaque 4)
Over the years, the site of the Haymarket bombing has become a powerful symbol for a diverse cross-section of people, ideals and movements. Its significance touches on the issues of free speech, the right of public assembly, organized labor, the fight for the eight-hour workday, law enforcement, justice, anarchy, and the right of every human being to pursue an equitable and prosperous life. For all, it is a poignant lesson in the rewards and consequences inherent in such human pursuits.
 
Location. 41° 53.094′ N, 87° 38.649′ W. Marker is in Chicago, Illinois, in Cook County. Marker is at the intersection of North Desplaines Street and West Couch Place, on the left when traveling south on North Desplaines Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 161 North Desplaines Street, Chicago IL 60661, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chicago & North Western Railway Powerhouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of the Sauganash Hotel/Wigwam
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #3 image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
3. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #3
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Wacker Drive (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Post Office (approx. 0.4 miles away); St. Patrick's Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Eastland Disaster (approx. 0.6 miles away); “Hubbard’s Folly” (approx. 0.6 miles away); Continental and Commercial Bank Building (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chicago.
 
Also see . . .
1. Haymarket affair - Wikipedia. The Haymarket affair is perhaps one of the 100 most significant events in United States history. (Submitted on September 30, 2011, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Chicago Historical Society - The Haymarket Affair Digital Collection. (Submitted on September 30, 2011, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
 
Categories. Labor Unions
 
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #4 image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
4. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Marker #4
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Markers on the east side. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
5. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Markers on the east side.
The plaque on the south side reads: The Haymarket Memorial Mary Brogger 2004 City of Chicago Richard M. Daley, Mayor Public Art Collection
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy plaques on the north side of the monumeny image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
6. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy plaques on the north side of the monumeny
The plaques read: This memorial marks the actual spot where the wagon used as the speaker’s platform stood on the evening of May 4, 1866 The site of the Haymarket Tragedy was designated a Chicago Landmark on March 25, 1992
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy anniversary plaque. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
7. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy anniversary plaque.
Commemorating the 125th anniversary of the Haymarket event that forever changed our history. Dedicated all workers of the world May 1, 2011 Illinois Labor History Society
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Monument image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
8. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Monument
Several international commemorative plaques can be seen on the west side of the monument.
Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Monument image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 29, 2011
9. Site of the Haymarket Tragedy Monument
Contemporary Illustration of the Haymarket Riot image. Click for full size.
By Harper's Weekly, May 15, 1886
10. Contemporary Illustration of the Haymarket Riot
Haymarket Square Mass Meeting Flier image. Click for full size.
1886
11. Haymarket Square Mass Meeting Flier
"Good speakers will be present to denounce the latest atrocious act of the police, the shooting of our fellow-workmen yesterday afternoon. -- The Executive Committee

This is the revised version of the flyer that was distributed, lacking the line Workingmen Arm Yourselves and Appear in Full Force! that was present in the initial version.

Image courtesy of Beinicke Library. (Click on image to enlarge.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 30, 2011, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 940 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on September 30, 2011, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   11. submitted on September 5, 2015. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement