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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

36 Meeting Street

c. 1740

 
 
36 Meeting Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
1. 36 Meeting Street Marker
Inscription.
This Georgian Style residence is an early example of the "Charleston Single House." The original woodwork is notable; the drawing room mantle is attributed to Charleston cabinet maker, Thomas Elfe. Unique in the kitchen building is the original cooking fireplace, intact.

Many eminent South Carolina family names are associated with this property; DeSaussure, Vanderhorst, Brunch, Rivers, Kershaw and Pelzer.

 
Erected by Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Preservation Society of Charleston marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.389′ N, 79° 55.831′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Meeting Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 36 Meeting Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 39 Meeting Street (a few steps from this marker); 37 Meeting Street (a few steps from this marker); William Bull's House (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Huger House (within shouting
36 Meeting Street Georgian Style residence image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
2. 36 Meeting Street Georgian Style residence
distance of this marker); Black and White Worlds: (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Landscape of the Enslaved (about 300 feet away); Nathaniel Russell House (about 300 feet away); George Eveleigh House (about 400 feet away); The Site of Colleton Bastion (about 400 feet away); Timothy Ford's House (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding 36 Meeting Street. From the Abstract of Title for 36 Meeting it is known that in May of 1741 the land was surveyed and that is was owned by Arnouldus Vanderhorst, a planter from Berkeley County. The land was sold in 1743 to a carpenter, Easie Brunch, and it was probably he who was responsible for building the house, which still stands today. The building is an excellent example of the Georgian style Charleston "single house'. It is quite similar to other houses built around the same time in both masonry and wood. The Thomas Elfe house on Queen Street should be viewed comparatively. It has been suggested that piazzas did not come into usage until late in the eighteenth
36 Meeting Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
3. 36 Meeting Street Marker
century. Therefore, it can be assumed from their simple style that the piazzas were added thirty or forty years after the house was built. Had the piazzas been added any later they would have probably reflected more Adamesque sensitivity. The piazza was definitely in place by 1816 as it is shown on a plat of that date. The piazzas can not be confused with Greek Revival style Piazza's because the proportions of the door surround reveal Georgian rather than Greek scale. The property originally contained four distinct buildings: the main house, the kitchen house, the stable, and a privy. These building excluding the privy were apparently connected around 1850. Part if this connection involved the addition of what now is the library. What was once the kitchen house and stable now serves as rooms for the Bed and Breakfast. The interior of this house has some of the finest Georgian detailing in the City. The mantel in the drawing room is attributed to Thomas Elfe because of its distinctive Mahogany framework. The "music clef" carving on the stairs is
quite unique and may reveal one of the original owner's interests.
 
Also see . . .
1. 36 Meeting Street, today. Built in 1740 this pre-Revolutionary War single house offers three elegant suites in the heart of the Historic District. (Submitted on October 1, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
36 Meeting Street (c. 1740) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
4. 36 Meeting Street (c. 1740)
 

2. Arnoldus Vanderhorst. After his service in the state Senate, Vanderhorst was elected mayor of Charleston for two terms. (Submitted on October 1, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Henry William de Saussure, from Wikipedia. At the age of 16, together with his father Daniel de Saussure (1736-1798), he participated in the defense of the city during the 1780 Siege of Charleston. (Submitted on October 1, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. Charleston Single House. The Charleston Single House is the architectural style most associated with Charleston, South Carolina. (Submitted on June 23, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Georgian Architecture. Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1720 and 1840. (Submitted on June 23, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 1, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 523 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 28, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on October 1, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on June 23, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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