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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newburyport in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Approach to Carr's Ferry

1630 - 1930

 
 
Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 8, 2011
1. Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker
Inscription. First ferry across the Merrimack river from Newbury to Salisbury, established about 1639, and the only route from Boston to the eastern frontier. In 1641 George Carr was appointed ferryman with rights which continued in his family for generations.
 
Erected 1930 by Massachusetts Bay Colony-Tercentenary Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Massachusetts Bay Colony—Tercentenary Commission Markers marker series.
 
Location. 42° 49.306′ N, 70° 53.683′ W. Marker is in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker is at the intersection of High Street (Massachusetts Route 113) and High Street & Jefferson Street when traveling east on High Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 360 High Street, Newburyport MA 01950, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Soldiers and Sailors of Newburyport 1861-1864 (approx. 0.2 miles away); “The Volunteer” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Soldiers of All Wars Marker (approx. mile away); The Large Packet Ship Dreadnought (approx. 0.3 miles away); Edward Rawson
Approaching the Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 8, 2011
2. Approaching the Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker
(approx. half a mile away); William Lloyd Garrison (approx. 1.3 miles away); Watts' Cellar (approx. 1.4 miles away); Coast Guard Bicentennial Marker (approx. 1.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newburyport.
 
Also see . . .  Historical Markers Erected by Massachusetts Bay Colony Tercentenary Commission (1930). Original 1930 publication by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts of Tercentenary Commission Markers, commemorating the three hundredth anniversary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. (Submitted on October 14, 2011, by Russell Chaffee Bixby of Bernardston, Massachusetts.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. On crossing the Merrimack River.
Although it is very hard to see in these photo, even on an ordinary sunny day, the Merrimack can be a very strong river to cross. If you look carefully at photo #5, you'll see that the boats are all stationary but there's still a wake around them. This river was not meandering on its way, instead it was rolling hard, boats going up-stream were slowly creeping across my view. If I had to guess, I'd speculate that this river was moving at 10-15 knots
Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 8, 2011
3. Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker
Following Jefferson Street to the end, approximatly a half mile (~800m), you'll find this view of the Merrimack river. The land you see on the other side of the river is a small island named "Carr Island", the terminus of the ferry ride described by the marker.
from left to right of my view. To attempt such a crossing on a regular basis without the aid of an engine and relying solely on manual power must have been "exciting" even on a peaceful day.
    — Submitted October 9, 2011, by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts.

 
Categories. Colonial EraRoads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 8, 2011
4. Approach to Carr's Ferry Marker
Remains of the landing spot of the Carr Ferry on Carr Island.
Carr's Ferry image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan
5. Carr's Ferry
The red arrow shows the approximate path the ferry took to the landing spot on yonder island. The area beyond the end of this street is private property but a friendly neighbor gave me some background on the path the ferry took.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2011, by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 735 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 9, 2011, by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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