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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newport in Newport County, Rhode Island — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Life in Fort Adams

 
 
Life in Fort Adams Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 8, 2011
1. Life in Fort Adams Marker
Inscription.
I did not have far or long to look, because, being the junior officer of the garrison I could displace no other, and besides, there was but one casemate available for me to choose from . . .   A good sweeping and a little glazing of broken windows made it quite comfortable. I took a share in an active young Irishman, wild and fresh from the Emerald Isle, whom two or three officers had in common as a servant. He soon had a roaring fire in my open grate and this quickly ate up the mould and moisture incident to a casemate long out of use.
- Lieutenant John C. Tidball, circa. 1848

Other officers during this period were less pleased with casemate quarters. Casemates, after all, were designed to house cannons, not people. Less than a year before Tidball’s arrival at Fort Adams, General Winfield Scott had petitioned Congress to build more comfortable quarters for officers serving in coastal fortifications, describing the “most unwholesome casemates” as “miserable places”.

[ Along Bottom of Marker : ]
1900 Census snapshot of life in Fort Adams:
1 Colonel • 6 Captains • 3 Lieutenants • 38 Sergeants • 39 Corporals • 269 Privates • 7 Cooks • 10 Musicians • 4 Mechanics • 2 Hospital Stewards • 27 Wives • 95 Children • 2 Mothers • 1 Sisiter • 21 Servants
Life in Fort Adams Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 8, 2011
2. Life in Fort Adams Marker
The tree shown in a photo on the marker can be seen here.
• 10 Miscellaneous
_____________________
535 Residents Total

Fort Adams Cemetery Contains
158 Men • 33 Women • 81 Children • 15 Unknown
_____________________
287 Deaths Total
 
Erected by Fort Adams State Park.
 
Location. 41° 28.754′ N, 71° 20.211′ W. Marker is in Newport, Rhode Island, in Newport County. Marker can be reached from Fort Adams Drive, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located inside Fort Adams. Marker is in this post office area: Newport RI 02840, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Building a Fortress (within shouting distance of this marker); Returning Old Glory 2001 (within shouting distance of this marker); Defending Narragansett Bay (within shouting distance of this marker); Going Great Guns (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Adams Foundation (within shouting distance of this marker); Erich A. O’D. Taylor (within shouting distance of this marker); The Irish Connection to Fort Adams (within shouting distance of this marker); Understanding the Fort (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newport.
 
More about this marker. A picture of a soldier
Marker in Fort Adams image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 8, 2011
3. Marker in Fort Adams
The casemate quarters are seen here behind the marker.
in his casemate quarters appears at the top of the marker. A picture of Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside appears at the right side of the marker. At the bottom of the marker are three photographs of civilians who lived at Fort Adams. The picture on the left shows four children under a tree believed to be the tree that still stands beside the marker.
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
Casemate Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 8, 2011
4. Casemate Quarters
The casemates where soldiers were quartered at Fort Adams have fallen into a state of disrepair and are in the process of being restored.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 10, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 469 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 10, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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