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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

126 Tradd Street

The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House

 

ócirca 1732 ó

 
126 Tradd Street The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House Marker including image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 2, 2011
1. 126 Tradd Street The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House Marker including
Medallion:
Award 1966 and 1975
Carolopolis
Condita A.D.
1670
and
Conservation
Easement Award
Inscription.
Residence of
the Surgeon General of
the Continnetal Army
and boyhood home of
Confederate Generals
Hamilton Prioleau Bee
& Bernard Bee.
One of only three
South Carolina homes with
early exposed interior
corner post construction,
a medieval English
building style.

 
Erected by Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Preservation Society of Charleston marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.454′ N, 79° 56.103′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Tradd Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Located between Logan and Legare Streets. Marker is at or near this postal address: 126 Tradd Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 125 Tradd Street (a few steps from this marker); 123 Tradd Street (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Peter's Episcopal Church Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); 32 Legare Street (about 300 feet away, measured in
126 Tradd Street The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 2, 2011
2. 126 Tradd Street The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House and Marker
a direct line); 95 Lenwood Boulevard (about 300 feet away); The Bowles - Legare House (about 400 feet away); The Reverend Paul Trapier Gervais House (about 500 feet away); Colonel John Stuart House (about 500 feet away); Toomer- Purse House (about 700 feet away); Simmons-Edwards House (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Kitchen House (aka Dr. Peter Fayssoux House). Located in the heart of Charleston's Historic District, The Kitchen House is a heart warming return to the charm of a simpler time. (Submitted on June 19, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Hamilton P. Bee. Hamilton Prioleau Bee (July 22, 1822 – October 3, 1897) was an American politician in early Texas who served one term as Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives and later was a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War. (Submitted on June 19, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. General Hamilton Prioleau Bee, CSA, HistoryCentral. In 1864, Bee
126 Tradd Street The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House Marker image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey,, circa 1977
3. 126 Tradd Street The Dr. Peter Fayssoux House Marker
Historic American Engineering Record, HABS SC,10-CHAR,322-2
commanded Texas cavalry regiments, three of which helped stop General Banks' Red River Campaign at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill. (Submitted on October 13, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. Barnard Elliott Bee Jr., Wikipedia entry. ...the First Battle of Bull Run, Bee is said to have used the term "stone wall" in reference to Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson and his men, giving rise to the name "Stonewall Jackson" and his Stonewall Brigade. ... (Submitted on October 13, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Pertaining to the subject of the house ,"The Carolopolis Award"
is a plaque placed on buildings that have been preserved, restored, rehabilitated or are outstanding examples of new construction. The award is presented to those individuals, businesses or organizations that currently own the property. The Carolopolis Award is a slightly modified reproduction of the seal of the City of Charleston. The word Carolopolis comes from the original name of the city.
    — Submitted June 19, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

2. Medical Society of South Carolina
The Medical Society of South
Hamilton Prioleau Bee<br>July 22, 1822 – October 3, 1897 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
4. Hamilton Prioleau Bee
July 22, 1822 – October 3, 1897
Texas House of Rep 1849-1859
Carolina ranks among the oldest of its kind in America, the three older than it being the New Jersey State Medical Society, founded in 1766, Massachusetts Medical Society, founded in 1781, and the College of Physicians, Philadelphia, founded 1787. The initiatory step in the founding of this society was taken by Dr. Peter Fayssoux. Dr. David Ramsey, the famous historian, and once president of the Continental Congress, and Dr. Alexander Barron were among the first members. The meetings were held at Williams' Coffee House and at Harris' Tavern, and were marked by a convivial flow of spirits of various kinds. As Dr. Michael, the historian of the Society, has remarked, the object of the organization was charity, and from this society as a parent have sprung the most noble charities of the city of Charleston. (Source: The American practitioner, Volumes 9-10 (1891), pg 29.
    — Submitted June 19, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Brig. Gen. Barnard Elliott Bee
Although a native of Charleston, Bee really considered himself a Texan. His father had moved the family there to become the secretary of state when Texas was still a republic. Bee graduated from West Point in 1845, far down in class ranking. He fought in Mexico and was fighting Indians when he left the
Barnard Elliott Bee<br>February 8, 1824 – July 22, 1861 image. Click for more information.
By Brian Scott
5. Barnard Elliott Bee
February 8, 1824 – July 22, 1861
army in March 1861 to join South Carolina's forces. Why he joined a South Carolina unit instead of a Texas one is a bit of a mystery. Bee was made a brigadier general on June 17, 1861, just a month before the war's first big clash at First Manassas.

In that battle, Bee's troops were falling back in disarray under pressure from superior Federal forces. Bee was trying to think of something to stem the tide when his eye caught another regiment in the rear that was not moving. Behind the regiment, astride a little sorrel horse, was a general clad in a blue uniform. Bee sang out to his troops, 'There stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally around the Virginians!'

There have always been two theories about this famous rallying cry. One theory claims that Bee was trying to impress his troops with how coolly the Virginians were holding their ground as the Federals advanced toward them. The other theory is not at all popular with Virginians. Some historians believe Bee was really cursing Jackson for keeping his troops in the rear when Jackson could plainly see that Bee's regiments were being cut to pieces. One wonders if Bee's next most famous call would have been: 'Jackson, get your butt down here, and help me shoot these Yankees!' History will never know. Within minutes, Bee was cut down. He died the next day, without knowing that he had created the most famous nickname any general bore during the war. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Jackson, jokingly called 'Tom Fool' to that point, would be remembered as 'Stonewall' Jackson forever. (Source: Touring the Carolinas' Civil War Sites, Clint Johnson (2003), pages 357-358.)
    — Submitted June 19, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 13, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,041 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 13, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on June 19, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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