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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Louisa in Louisa County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Custer's First Last Stand

A "Living Triangle"

 

—The Battle of Trevilian Station —

 
Custer's First Last Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
1. Custer's First Last Stand Marker
Inscription. Nearby stood Trevilian Station, south of which Confederate Gen. Wade Hampton had parked his wagon train on the evening of June 10, 1864. At daylight the next day, Gen. Matthew C. Butler and Col. Gilbert J. Wright advanced north on the Fredericksburg Stage Road to probe for Federals.

About 8 a.m., Union Gen. George A. Custer's Michigan Brigade turned west onto the Gordonsville Road from the Nunn's Creek Road at Mildred Crossing, with Col. Russell A. Alger's 5th Michigan Cavalry leading the way. Alger, seeing Hampton's parked wagons and horses, charged and captured most of them. His charge, however, carried him beyond the wagon park and into Gen. Thomas L. Rosser's brigade, which was galloping south to counterattack. Rosser drove Custer's troopers and the captured wagons east into Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's division, which was approaching from Louisa Court House. Butler and Wright turned back to join the fighting and help surround Custer's command, which spent four hours along in a "living triangle" and suffered heavy losses.

During the fighting, Custer's guidon bearer was mortally wounded and handed the brigade's flag to Custer, who ripped it from its staff and stuffed it into his shirt. Custer later carried a badly wounded trooper of the 5th Michigan Cavalry to safety and personally led a dismounted charge that retook one of his
Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
2. Battle Map
Note the north seeking arrow pointed to the bottom of the map
artillery pieces. Lee's men recovered Hampton's wagon train and horses and captured Custer's wagon train, including the headquarters wagon and all of Custer's personal effects.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 3.053′ N, 78° 4.439′ W. Marker is near Louisa, Virginia, in Louisa County. Marker is at the intersection of Louisa Road (U.S. 33) and Danne Road (County Route 682), on the right when traveling west on Louisa Road. Touch for map. Located at the east entrance to the K & B Gas Station (BP). Marker is at or near this postal address: 17561 Louisa Road, Louisa VA 23093, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Custer Rescued (here, next to this marker); Trevilian Station Battle (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Trevilians (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Trevillians (about 700 feet away); Netherland Tavern (approx. 0.9 miles away); Ogg Farm (approx. 1.6 miles away); Bibb's Crossroads (approx. 2.8 miles away); Green Springs (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Louisa.
 
More about this marker.
Trevilian Station Battlefield Driving Tour Stop Seven image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Trevilian Station Battlefield Driving Tour Stop Seven
On the upper right the marker displays portraits of Col. Russel Alger, Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, Gen. George Custer (as a West Point Cadet), and Gen. Thomas Rosser. A map detailing the action described in the text for this phase of the battle is on the lower right.
 
Regarding Custer's First Last Stand. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Trevilian Station, June 11-12, 1864. See the Battle of Trevilian Station Virtual Tour by Markers linked below for additional related markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Trevilian Station Battlefield Foundation. The foundation has worked to preserve the remaining sections of the battlefield. A detailed self-guided driving tour of the battlefield is offered. This marker is at stop seven of the tour. (Submitted on January 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Battle of Trevilian Station. National Park Service summary of the battle. (Submitted on January 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Trevilian Station Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Trevilian Station, June 11-12, 1864. The order of appearance is generally aligned to the National Parks Service and Trevilian Station Foundation driving tours. (Submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Custer Runs the Gap image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
4. Custer Runs the Gap
Moving down Nunn's Creek Road, a trace of which exists as CR 693, Custer passed around Confederate cavalry under Gen. Fitzhugh Lee at Louisa. This placed Custer's Brigade on the railroad and directly behind Gen. Wade Hampton's position.
 

4. Trevilian Station Preservation Efforts. The Civil War Preservation Trust continues their work ensuring the battlefield at Trevilian Station is preserved. The latest efforts target the Trevilian House where Custer made his headquarters during this phase of the battle. The house stands just to the northeast of the marker location. (Submitted on November 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

5. Trevilian Station Preservation Efforts. Civil War Preservation Trust continues efforts to set aside portions of the battlefield. Their site discussing the effort offers a wealth of background information about the battle, an article by noted historian Eric Wittenberg, and excellent maps of the battle. (Submitted on November 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Virginia Central Railroad image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
5. Virginia Central Railroad
Here at Mildred Crossing, Custer was able to harrass Hampton's wagon train. While firmly in the Confederate rear area and able to cause substantial damage, Custer was also precariously detached from friendly support. This spot is about a mile east of the marker location.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,155 times since then and 80 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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