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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
U Street Corridor in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Frelinghuysen University/Jesse Lawson and Rosetta C. Lawson

African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC

 

—1800 Vermont Avenue, NW —

 
Frelinghuysen University/Jesse Lawson and Rosetta C. Lawson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 8, 2011
1. Frelinghuysen University/Jesse Lawson and Rosetta C. Lawson Marker
Inscription. Frelinghuysen University was founded in 1917 to provide education, religious training, and social services for black working-class adults. Founders include Jesse Lawson, a Howard University-educated lawyer; his wife Rosetta C. Lawson, an advocate for temperance and low-income housing; and Howard sociologist Kelly Miller. The school's name honored U.S. Senator Frederick T. Frelinghuysen of New Jersey, a civil rights activist during Reconstruction (1865-1877).

After starting out in private homes and businesses, the school bought this house in 1921 and held classes here until 1927. Anna J. Cooper ran its successor, the Frelinghuysen Group of Schools for Colored Working People, from 1940 until it closed in the late 1950s.

Caption:
Frelinghuysen law graduates, 1917
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Smithsonian Institution
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.895′ N, 77° 1.608′ W. Marker is in U Street Corridor, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Vermont Avenue
Frelinghuysen University/Jesse Lawson and Rosetta C. Lawson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 8, 2011
2. Frelinghuysen University/Jesse Lawson and Rosetta C. Lawson Marker
on the low fence to the right of the stairs.
Northwest and 11th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling south on Vermont Avenue Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 800 Vermont Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Washington Afro-American Newspaper Office Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Howard University Sets the Standard (about 400 feet away); A Home Away From Home (about 400 feet away); Louise Burrell Miller Residence (about 500 feet away); Daniel A.P. Murray Residence (about 500 feet away); African American Civil War Memorial (about 600 feet away); Sailors / With Freedom Came the Greater YOU (about 700 feet away); Pioneers / With Freedom Came Their Community (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in U Street Corridor.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sen. Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen. (Submitted on October 16, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Kelly Miller (sociologist) in "Mathematicians of the African Diaspora". ... Johns Hopkins University had recently become the first American school to offer graduate work in mathematics. As Miller was to be the first African American student admitted to the university, the recommendation was decided by the Board of Trustees, who decided to admit Miller based on the university founder's known Quaker
800 Vermont Avenue, NW image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 8, 2011
3. 800 Vermont Avenue, NW
U.S. Department of the Interior National Register of Historic Places plaque, above doorbell button.
beliefs ... (Submitted on October 17, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. National Register of Historic Places
 
Categories. African AmericansEducationNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 16, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 16, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 819 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 16, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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