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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Georgetown County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

These Two Cannons

 
 
These Two Cannons Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
1. These Two Cannons Marker
Inscription. These two cannons were formerly mounted in front of the U.S. Naval Reserve Building on Front Street. Originally they were part of the Confederate defense system at Battery White near Georgetown.
 
Erected 1986 by the Navy Club of Georgetown and presented to the City of Georgetown.
 
Location. 33° 22.026′ N, 79° 17.103′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, South Carolina, in Georgetown County. Marker is on Front Street near Orange Street. Touch for map. Cannons are in Constitution Park at the foot of Orange Street on the waterfront. Marker is in this post office area: Georgetown SC 29440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. South Carolina's Third Oldest City (within shouting distance of this marker); Georgetown County Veteran’s Memorial (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Georgetown Steel Corporation (about 500 feet away); Georgetown’s Industrious Past (about 500 feet away); Major C. Spencer Guerry (about 500 feet away); Joseph Hayne Rainey Park (about 500 feet away); 24 Pound Naval Gun (about 500 feet away); Francis Marion (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .  Photos of Battery White
Marker is On the Cannon on the Left image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
2. Marker is On the Cannon on the Left
Cannons are mounted on brick bases built from bricks taken from the Navy Reserve Building, 1936–1984. Member names and rates are inscribed on many of the bricks.
. This fortification defended Georgetown at the time of the Civil War. Significant portions of the battery still stand near Belle Isle Plantation nearby. (Submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Cannon on the Right, Aimed Towards the Waterfront image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
3. Cannon on the Right, Aimed Towards the Waterfront
The other cannon can be seen behind the sea grass. Both pieces are of British origin.
Markings on the Cannon on the Left image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
4. Markings on the Cannon on the Left
The crown marking on the cannon indicates its manufacture was during King George III's reign, 1760-1820. However the less elaborate nature of the "crown" suggests this weapon was not a standard service piece but one cast for export. In the years between 1796 and 1800, during the Quasi War with France, the U.S. purchased many British guns either directly from the British government or on the open market. The crown and the letter P signify this cannon had passed the standards set for British military service.
Markings on the Cannon on the Right image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
5. Markings on the Cannon on the Right
The numbers at the bottom of the photograph are indications of weight measurements. In accordance with the British system of designation using measurements based on fractions of the the British long ton. Reading from left to right the numbers indicate measurements of "hundredweight" (112 pounds), "quarters" (28 pounds), and then the remainder of pounds. In this case 25 hundredweight and one quarter, with no remainders, means this piece weighed 2,828 pounds when cast.
Constitution Park, Georgetown, South Carolina image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
6. Constitution Park, Georgetown, South Carolina
View from the Waterfront image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
7. View from the Waterfront
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 20, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,493 times since then and 201 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 20, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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