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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
El Paso in El Paso County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

El Paso County

CSA

 
 
El Paso County CSA Memorial-Marker image. Click for full size.
By Zacharias Beau T, September 11, 1930
1. El Paso County CSA Memorial-Marker
Inscription. Voted 871 to 2 for secession. At start of Civil War Minutemen were organized to provide frontier protection. The San Elizario Spy Company was mustered into Confederate service on July 11, 1861. El Paso was the springboard and supply point for 1861-2 Arizona - New Mexico campaign to give South a Pacific outlet. These troops retired back into Texas and by July 1862, the last Confederate forces left El Paso. Many citizens who favored South went with them, others moved across the river and established a colony in Juarez. In mid-August, Union troops arrived. Martial law was declared and military occupation - longest in any part of Texas - continued until war's end.

(Back):
The number of federal troops occupying El Paso never exceeded 2 or 3 companies. Open pro-southern feeling was squelched during the war. There were recurrent rumors that the Texans were about to return and drive the federals out. Henry Skillman and his band of armed men operated courier service from unoccupied part of state to Confederate colony in Juarez. His men spread invasion rumors and acted as spies, which kept Union forces wary. It took two years before Skillman could be tracked down and killed. Most private property was seized and operated during occupation. Most food and fodder came from Mexican side. Other goods either came down the river from
El Paso County CSA Memorial-Marker (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Zacharias Beau T, September 11, 1930
2. El Paso County CSA Memorial-Marker (Reverse)
Santa Fe or were manufactured locally. Local elections were watched over by military. El Paso was represented during war in the Texas Legislature by pro-Confederates under a law allowing citizens of occupied areas to vote wherever they resided. Erected by the State of Texas, 1963
 
Erected 1963 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 1426.)
 
Location. 31° 45.602′ N, 106° 29.305′ W. Marker is in El Paso, Texas, in El Paso County. Marker is at the intersection of North Mesa Street (State Highway 20) and East Main Street, on the left on North Mesa Street. Touch for map. Memorial-marker is on northeast corner of San Jacinto Square in downtown El Paso. This site is made conspicuously prominent by the fountain sculptures of the El Paso alligators Sally, Oscar, and Minnie. Marker is in this post office area: El Paso TX 79901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hotel Cortez (within shouting distance of this marker); San Jacinto Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); The First United States Soldiers to Be Stationed at the Pass of the North (within shouting distance of this marker); El Camino Real (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Sidewalk Clock (within shouting distance of this marker); El Paso's Chinese Community (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of United States Courthouse (about 400 feet away); The Martin Building (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in El Paso.
 
More about this marker. Sculptured from Texas pink granite and just under five feet, the memorial-marker is typical of those erected by the state during the Confederate Texas centennial era.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 22, 2011, by Zacharias Beau T of Alpine, Texas. This page has been viewed 486 times since then and 100 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 22, 2011, by Zacharias Beau T of Alpine, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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