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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Camden in Kershaw County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Southern Campaign, Apr 1781 - Dec 1782

 
 
The Southern Campaign, Apr 1781 - Dec 1782 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
1. The Southern Campaign, Apr 1781 - Dec 1782 Marker
Inscription. Upon returning to South Carolina, Greene moved against Camden, where Lord Rawdon commanded the British garrison. Rawdon attacked the Americans at Hobkirk’s Hill on April 25, 1781, and defeated Greene. However, partisan forces cut the British line of communication with Charleston, forcing Rawdon to evacuate Camden on May 10. Greene then marched westward to attack the British post at Ninety Six.

Greene’s army arrived at Ninety Six on May 22 and besieged the garrison. Rawdon marched from Charleston to relieve the siege and Greene withdrew after his June 18 assault on the fortified town failed. Unable to bring Greene to battle, Rawdon evacuated Ninety Six on June 29. Meanwhile, other American forces had captured Augusta, Georgia, on June 5.

With most of the backcountry lost, the British hoped to defend a line along the Santee River. Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart, who had replaced Rawdon, was camped at Eutaw Springs near the Santee when Greene launched a surprise attack on September 8. The British held the field, but their army was badly weakened. Stewart withdrew to the vicinity of Charleston.

In Virginia, Lord Cornwallis took position at Yorktown, where American and French forces under George Washington and the Comte de Rochambeau forced him to surrender on October 19, 1781. Washington then sent Major General Anthony
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
2. Overview
Wayne with reinforcements for Greene.

Greene assigned Wayne to confine the British troops in Georgia to Savannah, while his own army held the British in South Carolina in their lines around Charleston. The British evacuated Savannah in July 1782 and left Charleston in December, ending the Southern Campaign.

“I have the honor to communicate … the information of the evacuation of Charles Town … This important event gives us compleat possession of all the Southern States.” Nathanael Greene
 
Location. 34° 14.053′ N, 80° 36.25′ W. Marker is in Camden, South Carolina, in Kershaw County. Marker can be reached from Broad Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in the Historic Camden Battle Site. Marker is in this post office area: Camden SC 29020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Camden - Strategic Key (here, next to this marker); The Southern Campaign, Aug 1780 - Apr 1781 (here, next to this marker); The Southern Campaign, Dec 1778 - Aug 1780 (here, next to this marker); The Fortified Post (a few steps from this marker); Palisade Wall (a few steps from this marker); Native Allies
Map on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
3. Map on the marker
Plan of the Siege of Ninety Six From William Johnson’s Sketches of the Life and Correspondence of Nathanael Greene, Vol. 2, Charleston, 1822.
(within shouting distance of this marker); War in the Backcountry (within shouting distance of this marker); Women in the Revolution (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Camden.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Picture on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
4. Picture on the marker
Engraving after Chappel by Johnson, Wilson & Co., 1874. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 1, 2011, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 313 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 1, 2011, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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