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Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

War Comes to Mount Welby

[Oxon Hill Farm]

 
 
War Comes to Mount Welby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
1. War Comes to Mount Welby Marker
Inscription.
“I should not be surprised if Government persists in their determination to quarrel with England that we should experience all the horrors of civil discord.”
Letter of Mary Welby De Butts to her brother, Richard Earl Welby, April 2, 1812

In the letter above, Mary DeButts was right to worry. The quarrel between the United States and Great Britain erupted into the War of 1812 only two month after she wrote to her brother.
This international power struggle had very personal consequences for Samuel and Mary DeButts. One of the warís most important battles was fought within a few miles of Mount Welby. For part of the war they fled their home. And down on the Potomac, they got a close look at the might of the British Navy.
The causes of the war were complicated and reached from the American frontier across the Atlantic Ocean.

Causes of the War of 1812

In the North, some Americans hoped to invade British Canada as part of a war and perhaps annex Canadian provinces as new states of the Union

. Settlers believed British agents were encouraging American Indians to attack forts and settlements. In a war with Britain, westerners saw a chance to drive British troops off the frontier and conquer Indian lands.

Locked in a war with France, Great
The War Comes to Mount Welby Marker at the pasture fence, east of the Mount Welby House image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
2. The War Comes to Mount Welby Marker at the pasture fence, east of the Mount Welby House
- view toward the treeline with the Potomac River beyond.
Britain stopped American merchant ships and sometimes confiscated their cargoes. The British Navy also searched ships for British deserters. By 1810, the British were forcing about 1,000 seamen a year off U.S. ships and on to British vessels. The treatment of American ships and sailors outraged the people and leaders of the new nation.

The territories of Florida and Texas belonged to Britainís ally, Spain. Southerners reasoned that these lands might be opened to expansion if Britain lost a war with the United States.

[Political map of eastern North America during the War of 1812]

[Illustrations of early 19th century warship types:]
Block Sloop - Gun Barge - Gun Boat - Rocket Ship – Bombship - Frigate
(American vessels are shown in blue and the British in red.)

Redrawn by Jon G. Dean from original illustrations by Calvert Marine Museum for all boats, except the British Rocket Boat which is redrawn from an original illustration by Carl E. Franklin.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 48.146′ N, 77° 0.562′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Oxon Hill Farm Hiker Trail west of Bald
The Oxon Hill Park deer herd, grazing in the pasture near the marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
3. The Oxon Hill Park deer herd, grazing in the pasture near the marker
Eagle Road. Touch for map. Bald Eagle Road is accessible south of the the Capital Beltway (I-95/495) from Oxon Hill Road, west of Indian Head Highway (MD 210). The marker can be found on the west side of the Mount Welby/Oxon Hill farm house. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6411 Oxon Hill Road, Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The DeButts Family Comes to Maryland - Mount Welby (within shouting distance of this marker); "Rockets on the Hill" (within shouting distance of this marker); The Burning of Washington, D.C. (within shouting distance of this marker); Wheat and Tobacco (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Root Cellar (about 300 feet away); Why a Brick Stable? (about 500 feet away); Two Centuries of Farm Buildings (about 600 feet away); Oxon Cove, the Potomac, and the Chesapeake (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Also see . . .  War of 1812 - Chesapeake Campaign. (Submitted on November 4, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. U.S. Navy; Royal Navy; Napoleonic Wars
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar of 1812Waterways & Vessels
 
Rocket Ship<br>(British) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
4. Rocket Ship
(British)
Close-up of image on marker
Bombship<br>(British) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
5. Bombship
(British)
Close-up of image on marker
Frigate<br>(British) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
6. Frigate
(British)
Close-up of image on marker
Gun Boat<br>(American) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
7. Gun Boat
(American)
Close-up of image on marker
Gun Barge<br>(American) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
8. Gun Barge
(American)
Close-up of image on marker
Block Sloop<br>(American) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 17, 2011
9. Block Sloop
(American)
Close-up of image on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 548 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 4, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5, 6. submitted on December 24, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on December 30, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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