Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Grantsville in Garrett County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Fuller-Baker House

A Rare Log Building with a Pedigree

 
 
The Fuller-Baker House Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
1. The Fuller-Baker House Marker
Inscription. This humble log cabin is a rare survivor of a common dwelling built by early settlers on the Allegheny frontier. Built after 1813 as a two-story log building, its large size has led some to believe it was once used as a tavern, giving respite to travelers along the National Road. It would be the only log tavern to survive on the old National Road between Cumberland and Wheeling, West Virginia.

Henry Fuller came to the Grantsville area in 1837 to work as a stonemason. His talents with stone and brick are still on display in several town buildings. He opened the National Hotel, the finest in the young community, but soon moved here, where he spent the rest of his life. The Bakers, also early settlers in the Grantsville area, were subsequent owners.

A Historic House on Historic Land. the Fuller-Baker House sits on land with an early-American pedigree. General Braddock's British army chose the site for its fifth camp as it marched to meet the French at Fort Duquesne in 1755.

In 1791, Thomas Johnson (1732—1819), Maryland's first governor, purchased 23,000 acres of Military Lots, fifty acre tracts of unclaimed land set aside by Maryland to reward Revolutionary War veterans. The Fuller-Baker House site (Military Lot No. 2206) was a part of that purchase.
 
Marker series.
Fuller-Baker Log House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
2. Fuller-Baker Log House and Marker
This is the side that faced the National Road. The present alignment of US 40 can be seen behind the house.
This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 41.765′ N, 79° 10.335′ W. Marker is in Grantsville, Maryland, in Garrett County. Marker can be reached from National Pike (Alternate U.S. 40) west of Shade Hollow Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Use Exit 19 on I-68. Marker is in this post office area: Grantsville MD 21536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. General Braddock’s 5th Camp (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grantsville (approx. 0.8 miles away); Leo J. Beachy (approx. 0.9 miles away); Casselman Hotel (approx. 1.1 miles away); Traveling the National Road (approx. 1.1 miles away); Early Inns (approx. 1.1 miles away); The Little Crossings (approx. 1˝ miles away); Casselman River Bridge (approx. 1˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Grantsville.
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
The Fuller-Baker House image. Click for full size.
circa 1979
3. The Fuller-Baker House
Fuller Baker Log House, Rear View image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
4. Fuller Baker Log House, Rear View
This is the view you see when you approach on U.S. 40 heading east. When heading west, you can miss the house for the trees.
Stonemason's Mark Over Coal Scuttle image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
5. Stonemason's Mark Over Coal Scuttle
You'll have to click on the image to zoom in. A stonemason's chisel and hammer are carved into a log over what might have been the coal scuttle to cellar.
Abandoned National Road Bridge over Shade Run, Next to House image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
6. Abandoned National Road Bridge over Shade Run, Next to House
Abandoned National Road Bridge over Shade Run, Next to House image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 11, 2006
7. Abandoned National Road Bridge over Shade Run, Next to House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 11, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 11, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,411 times since then and 86 times this year. Last updated on January 23, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 11, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on November 8, 2016.   4. submitted on August 11, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on August 12, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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