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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clear Springs in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wilsonís Store

Store of Three Wonders

 
 
Wilson's Store Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, October 20, 2007
1. Wilson's Store Marker
Inscription. "You wonder if we have it. We wonder where it is. You wonder how we found it!” That is how Janice Keefer remembered her fatherís store during the 42 years that Dorsey Martin conducted business here. Originally opened by Rufus Wilson in 1850, the store remained in continuous operation for National Road travelers until it closed in 1975. In 1983, Frances and Lewis Horst rescued the Wilson store and school house, and have restored them to their heyday splendor.

(Sidebar): The Last One-Room School House
Rufus Wilson constructed a one-room school in 1857 to ensure his son received an education. The school operated for 98 years. Maria Angle, a native of Clear Spring, taught grades 1-7 here from 1913-1916. She recalled that she taught 30 students each year but seldom had discipline problems. “Most of the children were from farm families. I didnít attempt to smack any of them, for they were all larger than I was.”
 
Erected by America's Byways.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 39.393′ N, 77° 51.081′ W. Marker is in Clear Springs, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Rufus Wilson Road
Wilson's one room school image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, October 20, 2007
2. Wilson's one room school
, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. This is Wayside 34 on the Historic National Road in Maryland. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14921 Rufus Wilson Road, Clear Spring MD 21722, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gettysburg Campaign ( a few steps from this marker); Wilson Bridge ( approx. ľ mile away); a different marker also named Wilson Bridge ( approx. 0.3 miles away); “The Bank Road” ( approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Gettysburg Campaign ( approx. 0.8 miles away); Miller's Tavern & Spickler's Buggy Factory ( approx. 0.8 miles away); Shielding the Army ( approx. 2.7 miles away); Capt. Samuel G. Prather ( approx. 3.5 miles away).
 
More about this marker. A drawing of the store as it looked in the early 20th century and a portrait of Wilson are in the lower left side of the marker. "Rufus Hillery Wilson began construction of his store while working at Huyett's Mill, just north of the Wilson Bridge. He died of pneumonia in 1883, and his son took over the operation of the store until 1919." In the sidebar is a Winslow Homer painting of children at play at a schoolhouse. The background of the marker is "National Road at Fairview Inn" which is the standard
Wilsonís Store Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 19, 2012
3. Wilsonís Store Marker
for markers in this series. An elevation diagram of the national road is displayed on the bottom of the marker's face.
 
Categories. EducationRoads & Vehicles
 
Wilson's Store with Gettysburg and Wilson's Store markers image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 2, 2008
4. Wilson's Store with Gettysburg and Wilson's Store markers
Wilson's Store image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, October 20, 2007
5. Wilson's Store
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 24, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,526 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 24, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   3. submitted on October 26, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4. submitted on March 2, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   5. submitted on January 24, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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