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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Why is the Washington Monument Temporarily Closed?

 
 
Why is the Washington Monument <br>Temporarily Closed? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 11, 2011
1. Why is the Washington Monument
Temporarily Closed? Marker
Inscription.
On August 23, 2011, a magnitude 5.8 earthquake centered in Virginia sent tremors throughout eastern North America. This seismic activity affected a number of Washington, D.C. landmarks, including the Washington Monument. National Park Service engineers and experts in historic preservation and earthquake engineering immediately assessed the physical impact in order to determine the best way to repair this national treasure and restore public access.

Completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1884, the Washington Monument honors George Washington for his generalship in the Revolutionary War (1775-1783) and for his later refusal to serve more than two terms as President of the United States (1789-1797). The Monument remains the worldís tallest freestanding stone structure, having weathered several earthquakes, including one in 1897 with a magnitude of 5.9.

For Another Birdís Eye View:
The National Park Service suggests a visit to the 270-foot observation level of the historic Old Post Office Tower, open daily, except December 25th. Located at 12th Street and Pennsylvania, NW, the tower ranks third in height among Washington, D.C. buildings and offers sweeping views of the Nationís Capital.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location.
Why is the Washington Monument Temporarily Closed? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 11, 2011
2. Why is the Washington Monument Temporarily Closed? Marker
Marker has been permanently removed. It was located near 38° 53.344′ N, 77° 2.002′ W. Marker was in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker was at the intersection of 15th Street NW and Jefferson Drive NW, on the left when traveling north on 15th Street NW. Touch for map. Marker is located on the east side of the Washington Monument. Marker was in this post office area: Washington DC 20024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Raoul Wallenberg Place (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Smokey Bear Blue Spruce (about 500 feet away); Jean Hillery and Thomas Quadros (about 600 feet away); The General Dwight David Eisenhower Plaza (about 800 feet away); Escape Across the Potomac (about 800 feet away); Jefferson Pier (approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker shows a map of North America indicating the epicenter of the earthquake in Mineral, Virginia and its proximity to Washington, D.C. as well as Toronto, Ontario and Atlanta, Georgia.
Photographs at the lower left of the marker depict “Cracks in the pyramidion on the west side of the
Marker at the Washington Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 11, 2011
3. Marker at the Washington Monument
The marker is seen here near the base of the Washington Monument.
Monument.”; “Daylight appear[ing] where mortar and historic joint filler once were.”; and “National Park Service personnel amidst fallen marble and mortar.”
Finally, under the Birdís Eye View sidebar is a map of the National Mall indicating the location of the Washington Monument. Next to this is a picture of The Old Post Office Tower.
 
Categories. DisastersMan-Made Features
 
The Washington Monument with scaffolding and earthquake damage repairs in progress. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 12, 2013
4. The Washington Monument with scaffolding and earthquake damage repairs in progress.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 13, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 580 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 13, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on January 9, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.
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