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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm

 
 
Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 12, 2008
1. Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm.
Entrance marker with site map (slight damage noted)
Inscription.
Welcome to Oxon Cove Park. Around here a walk in the park is a walk back in time. Exhibits along the way will help you find the layers of time. The Mount Welby historic house also has exhibits.

Today Oxon Hill Farm is the main feature of Oxon Cove Park. You can experience some of daily life on a working farm from the early 1900s, complete with pigs, chicken, horses, a garden, barns, farm machinery, and much more.

Oxon Cove Park is also a great spot for watching wildlife, walking a nature trail, and fishing. Open grassland, forests, marshes and swamps are all part of the park.

[Marker includes a time line as follows]:
Pre-1600s
: The Piscataway Indian people were farming land along the Potomac River in this area when the first Europeans arrived.

Late 1600s-Early 1800s: John Addison and his descendants, wealthy planters and colonial leaders, owned this land. Part of the estate was known as Oxon Hill Manor. The Addisons grew tobacco oats and corn with the labor of many enslaved people.

Early 1800s-1843: In the early 1800s, Dr. Samuel DeButts, a native of Ireland bought some 250 acres of the former Oxon Hill Manor. DeButts renamed the property Mount Welby in honor of his wife's family.

1843-1891: The property stayed in the family until 1843.
Oxon Hill Farm. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 13, 2008
2. Oxon Hill Farm.
View from inside main entrance gate.
Over the next four decades the land belonged to a series of owners.

1891-1959: In 1891 the federal government bought 350 acres of land that include the former estate of Samuel DeButts. The property became a farm that provided food to thousands of patients at nearby St. Elizabeths Hospital.

1959-present: Farming for St. Elizabeths Hospital ended here in the late 1950s. In 1967, the land was transferred to the National Park Service for educational purposes.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 48.096′ N, 77° 0.262′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Bald Eagle/Oxon Hill Farm (Access) Road. 0.1 miles north of Oxon Hill Road (State Route 414). Touch for map. The Marker is at the farm's main entrance gate which is at the west end of its public parking lot, just north of the Capital Beltway (I-95) and accessible only from Oxon Hill Road on the south side of the Beltway via the Bald Eagle Road and bridge over the Beltway. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6411 Oxon Hill Road, Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. War All Around (a few steps from this marker); A Farm for St. Elizabeths, 1891-1950
Mount Welby image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 12, 2008
3. Mount Welby
Plantation house built by Dr. Samuel DeButts in the early 1800s. The white paint-scheme dates from the early 1900s when the house was first occupied by St. Elizabeths Hospital personnel.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sweet Sorghum (about 700 feet away); Two Centuries of Farm Buildings (approx. 0.2 miles away); Why a Brick Stable? (approx. 0.2 miles away); Root Cellar (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wheat and Tobacco (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Burning of Washington, D.C. (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
More about this marker. The turn off is at the first signal light on Oxon Hill Road (MD 414)west of Indian Highway (MD 210).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. National Park Service website for Oxon Cove Park/Oxon Hill Farm. (Submitted on January 26, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. St. Elizabeths Hospital. (Submitted on January 28, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm. - National Register of Historic
View from Mount Welby, west over Oxon Cove to the Potomac River. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 12, 2008
4. View from Mount Welby, west over Oxon Cove to the Potomac River.
The DeButts family fled their home in 1814 when British invaders burned the U.S. capitol a few miles north of this point and Royal Navy patrolled the river nearby.
Places (2003) (Submitted on October 31, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

4. Jacob Shaw on the Underground Railroad. (Submitted on November 8, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Jacob Shaw; Salubria; Berry Plantation; slavery
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAgricultureAntebellum South, USColonial Era
 
National Park Service Visitor Center, Oxon Hill Farm. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 12, 2008
5. National Park Service Visitor Center, Oxon Hill Farm.
Oxon Cove ["Creek"] - view toward the Anacostia Fwy. (I-295) and the Potomac River image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 30, 2011
6. Oxon Cove ["Creek"] - view toward the Anacostia Fwy. (I-295) and the Potomac River
from the park's picnic area on its south bank.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 26, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 4,855 times since then and 63 times this year. Last updated on November 14, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 26, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on January 27, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on October 30, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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