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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

[Galveston County] 1901-1965

 
 
[Galveston] 1901 - 1965 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, November 24, 2011
1. [Galveston] 1901 - 1965 Marker
Inscription. After 1900 the Port of Galveston emerged as the second largest in the United States. Following completion of a deep water channel to Texas City in 1904, the mainland’s major petroleum petro-chemical plants, tin smelter and allied industries, had their beginning. Galveston’s waterfront handles primarily dry cargo while Texas City handles liquid petroleum and petro-chemical cargoes.

Agricultural production is also important to the Galveston County economy. Rice, corn, grain, dairying, poultry, truck crops and cattle raising are leading items.

In 1913, the U.S. Army moved 10,000 men and eight of its twelve airplanes to Texas City. With the first successful test flight made from Texas City to San Antonio.

In 1928, Galveston County began initial seawall protection for Texas City. Following the devastating effect of hurricane Carla in 1961, construction began on a 17-mile protective system extending around Texas City and La Marque.

Disaster struck Texas City April 16, 1947, with the explosion of the French-Flag steamer Grandcamp. Resulting fires and explosions left 576 persons dead, 4000 persons injured and $70,000,000 property damage. Undismayed, the city rebuilt.

In addition to its port facilities, Galveston is a large supplier of seafood, is a major financial center, has a tea blending
[Galveston] 1901 - 1965 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, November 24, 2011
2. [Galveston] 1901 - 1965 Marker
This is the Galveston County Courthouse. This and several other markers are located on the circular path you can see around the statue about 200 feet ahead.
plant, a nail and wire factory, grain elevators, a brewery, several large insurance companies, a ship repair yard and many port associated industries. A servicing facility for nuclear powered commercial vessels is also maintained here.

A major contributor to the Galveston economy is The University of Texas Medical Branch. Created in 1881, the facility is known as the “Mayo’s of the South” and is a leading heart, surgical, and burns treatment center. The Galveston County Memorial Hospital was constructed on the mainland in 1952.

With the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Manned Spacecraft Center in 1961 at Clear Lake, bordering Galveston and Harris counties, many residents of Galveston County became employed in the space effort. Space vehicles and equipment were tested in nearby Galveston Bay.
 
Erected by The County of Galveston.
 
Location. 29° 18.179′ N, 94° 47.389′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of 722 Moody Avenue and Winnie Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Galveston TX 77550, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Texas Revolution and Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rt. Rev. Monsignor James Martin Kirwin (within shouting distance of this marker); [Galveston County] Early History (within shouting distance of this marker); Exploration [of Galveston] (within shouting distance of this marker); Texas Bar Association (within shouting distance of this marker); George Campbell Childress (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Mariner: Leon Smith (within shouting distance of this marker); Galveston in the Republic of Texas (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Regarding [Galveston County] 1901-1965. Both the deadliest natural disaster and the deadliest industrial disaster in United States history were in Galveston County.

The hurricane in 1900 that swept over the island of Galveston caused an estimated death toll between 6,000 and 12,000 people.

The explosion of the French ship Grandcamp in 1947 at Texas City killed over 675 people.
 
Also see . . .
1. Galveston County in the Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on December 1, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. Galveston County in Wikipedia. (Submitted on December 1, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. Galveston Hurricane of 1900. The greatest loss of life natural disaster in U.S history (Submitted on December 2, 2011.) 

4. Battle of Galveston (War Between the States). (Submitted on December 2, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
5. Texas City Disaster. The Greatest Loss of Life Industrial Disaster in U.S. History (Submitted on December 2, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 519 times since then and 47 times this year. Last updated on December 2, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 1, 2011, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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