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Schenectady in Schenectady County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of the Home of Charles Proteus Steinmetz

From 1903 Until His Death in 1923.

 
 
Site of the Home of<br>Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 8, 2011
1. Site of the Home of
Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker
Inscription. A pioneer in electrical engineering . He was president of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Consulting Engineer of the General Electric Company and Professor of Engineering at Union College. A civic leader he was chairman of the Schenectady School Board and President of the Common Council he served both the broad world of science and the interests of his home city.
 
Erected 1945.
 
Location. 42° 49.071′ N, 73° 55.294′ W. Marker is in Schenectady, New York, in Schenectady County. Marker is at the intersection of Wendle Avenue and Adams Road, on the right when traveling south on Wendle Avenue. Touch for map. The marker is in Steinmetz Memorial Park at the end of a walkway, 200 feet straight back from the sidewalk. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1297 Wendell Ave, Schenectady NY 12308, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Whipple Bowstring Truss (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Nott Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ignacy Jan Paderewski (approx. 0.6 miles away); ALCo Site (approx. 0.6 miles away); Revolutionary Hospital & Continental Barracks
Site of the Home of<br>Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 8, 2011
2. Site of the Home of
Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker
(approx. ¾ mile away); Schenectady Police Department (approx. 0.8 miles away); Schenectady's Little Italy (approx. 0.9 miles away); Ellis Hospital (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Schenectady.
 
Regarding Site of the Home of Charles Proteus Steinmetz. Steinmetz Memorial Park consists of 2.07 acres in the GE Realty Plot at 1297 Wendell Ave. in Schenectady. A monument there is dedicated to GE’s “Electrical Wizard”, located on the former site of his home. In 1900, in a carriage barn behind his previous Stockade residence, Steinmetz launched the GE Research & Development Laboratory, the first such laboratory in the United States. The current GE R&D Laboratory is located in Niskayuna, on River Road.

After Steinmetz’s death, former President Herbert Hoover headed a committee to raise $25,000 to purchase the Steinmetz house and convert it into a museum. The money was raised but the city and state could not agree on the responsibility for restoring it, so it was torn down in 1938. The site is now Steinmetz Memorial Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Charles Steinmetz: Union's Electrical Wizard
Site of the Home of<br>Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 3, 2011
3. Site of the Home of
Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker
This is the back side of the marker, looking toward Wendall Ave.
. (Submitted on December 3, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. Charles Proteus Steinmetz: Inventor. (Submitted on December 3, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
3. The Edison Tech Center Hall of Fame: Charles P. Steinmetz. (Submitted on December 3, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Steinmetz Day in Schenectady
In the City of Schenectady April 9th is Steinmetz Day:
"Whereas our city and the world at large sometimes needs reminding that the innate good of the individual spirit striving to achieve and overcome obstacles as so fully illustrated by Mr. Steinmetz is a highly valued and laudatory endeavor, now therefore be it resolved that this city council in recognition of this extraordinary individual hereby designated April 9th of each year as Charles Proteus Steinmetz Day in memory of the many contributions in this city and to humanity made by our esteemed fellow Schenectadian, Charles Proteus Steinmetz"

Steinmetz was born on April 9th, 1865
    — Submitted December 3, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceScience & Medicine
 
Site of the Home of Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 13, 2011
4. Site of the Home of Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker
Site of the Home of<br>Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 14, 2011
5. Site of the Home of
Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker
Site of the Home of Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 30, 2011
6. Site of the Home of Charles Proteus Steinmetz Marker
Vandals have sprayed paint on the monument plaque.
Charles Proteus Steinmetz<br>(April 9, 1865 – October 26, 1923)<br>circa 1915 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
7. Charles Proteus Steinmetz
(April 9, 1865 – October 26, 1923)
circa 1915
Home of Charles P. Steinmetz image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 9, 2011
8. Home of Charles P. Steinmetz
This photo of the Steinmetz home is in the collection of the Edison Tech Center in Schenectady.
Steinmetz at Camp Mohawk image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 9, 2011
9. Steinmetz at Camp Mohawk
At Schenectady Steinmetz built a campsite, shown here, on the Mohawk River. During the summer he would work in his canoe, paddling up and down the river. Boards would be placed from gunwale to gunwale to serve as a desk, and he would kneel on a cushion in the canoe doing mathematical calculations. He enjoyed inviting guests to the camp on weekends and usually entertained from six to eight people, especially enjoying the company of children. As host he enjoyed doing the cooking, but refused to do dishes, which became the guests’ chore. In fact he would take out all of the dishes from the past several days for the guests to wash. When the camp was hit by lightening, Steinmetz invented a way to produce lightening so that he could study it. When he died in 1923 the camp was purchased by Henry Ford who had it moved to Dearborn Institute in Michigan. This photo is in the collection of the Edison Tech Center in Schenectady.
Steinmetz Canoe image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 9, 2011
10. Steinmetz Canoe
The 1920 Canoe of Charles P. Steinmetz made by Old Town Canoe of Maine is on loan from "Olde Tymers" Greg Sowers of Canaan, N.Y. to the Edison Tech Center in Schenectady. The photo above the canoe shows Steinmetz in this canoe, with papers spread out, at Camp Mohawk in 1922, one year before his death.
Charles Steinmetz's<br>1914 Detroit Electric image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 9, 2011
11. Charles Steinmetz's
1914 Detroit Electric
Charles Steinmetz's 1914 Detroit Electric, a Model 48 Duplex Drive Brougham, owned by Union College. Union College uses the car annually during commencement ceremonies. It is seen on display at the Edison Tech Center in Schenectady.
Steinmetz Memorial & Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 21, 2011
12. Steinmetz Memorial & Gravestone
Steinmetz is buried in the Vale Cemetery in Schenectady
N 42.80793 W 73.92530
Steinmetz Memorial and Gravestone in Vale Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 15, 2011
13. Steinmetz Memorial and Gravestone in Vale Cemetery
Steinmetz sister, Clara W. Steinmetz (1857 - 1940), is to the left of Charles in this photo.
Steinmetz Park in Schenectady image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 14, 2011
14. Steinmetz Park in Schenectady
The pond in Steinmetz Park, (not to be confused with Steinmetz Memorial Park) which is sometimes called Steinmetz Lake. Steinmetz Park is a recreational park, approximately 45 acres in size. Steinmetz Park was established nearly a century ago when Schenectady was rapidly growing into the city it is today. Citizens of the Second Ward began petitioning for a park in the 1920s and, in 1926, the Park Board urged the City of Schenectady to acquire lands “required for the development of the Second Ward Park.” Lands were first purchased in 1931 and not long thereafter were designated as Second Ward Park. Additional lands were purchased throughout the 1930s and the park grew to nearly 45 acres. Eventually, the park was named Steinmetz Park, after Charles Proteus Steinmetz, one of America’s brightest scientists, cofounder of General Electric, and Commissioner of Parks and City Planning in Schenectady during the formation of both Steinmetz Park and Central Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 13, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 1,240 times since then and 96 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on December 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   11. submitted on December 3, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   12, 13. submitted on December 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   14. submitted on December 3, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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