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Hamburg Township in Livingston County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Hamburg / Edwin B. Winans

 
 
Hamburg - Side A image. Click for full size.
circa August 15, 2011
1. Hamburg - Side A
Inscription.
Side A:
Hamburg
The year 1831 marked the arrival of Hamburg's first settlers -- Felix Dunlavy, Jesse Hall, Calvin Jackson, Cornelius Miller and Herman Lake -- and their families. In 1835, Ann Arbor merchant E.F. Gray and Amariah Hammond purchased thirty acres of land in this area, constructed a dam and built the area's first sawmill. By 1837 the two men had sold their interest to the Grisson brothers, who had emigrated from Hamburg, Germany, in 1834. The Grissons also managed a store, a gristmill and a hotel. in 1857 the village of Hamburg was platted, and in 1840 its post office was established. John Grisson was the first postmaster. One hundred and fifty years after its founding, the village of nine hundred residents boasted a historic Episcopal church, a volunteer fire department, several stores and factories, a library, a cemetery and a township hall.

Side B:
Edwin B. Winans
Edwin B. Winans (1826-1894), was the first Democrat to be elected governor of Michigan after the Civil War. Serving a two-year term starting in 1890, he instituted the secret ballot system. A native of New York, Winans moved to Livingston County, Michigan, at the age of eight. He attended Albion College and the University of Michigan Law School before leaving the state to seek
Edwin B Winans - Side B image. Click for full size.
By Dave Wilcox, August 27, 2010
2. Edwin B Winans - Side B
his fortune in the California gold rush. In 1858 he returned to Michigan and purchased a 400-acre farm in Hamburg. He enjoyed an active political career, serving as a state representative (1861-64), constitutional convention delegate (1867), township supervisor (1872-73), Livingston County probate judge (1877-81), and congressman (1883-86). He died at his Winans Lake estate in Hamburg Township in 1894.
 
Erected 1986 by Bureau of History, Michigan Department of State. (Marker Number S0583.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Michigan Historical Commission marker series.
 
Location. 42° 26.561′ N, 83° 48.162′ W. Marker is in Hamburg Township, Michigan, in Livingston County. Marker is at the intersection of Hamburg Road and Strawberry Lake Road, on the right when traveling north on Hamburg Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Whitmore Lake MI 48189, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Stephen's (approx. half a mile away); Webster United Church of Christ (approx. 5.7 miles away); Delhi Bridge (approx. 7.6 miles away); Dexter Depot / Track Pans
Hamburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Urich, June 10, 2012
3. Hamburg Marker
(approx. 8.2 miles away); St. Joseph Catholic Church (approx. 8.3 miles away); Dexter Area Civil War Memorial (approx. 8.5 miles away); In memory of all Veterans (approx. 10.8 miles away); Michigan Central Railroad Depot (approx. 11.2 miles away).
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesGovernmentNotable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
Edwin B. Winans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Urich, June 10, 2012
4. Edwin B. Winans Marker
Hamburg / Edwin B. Winans Marker and Hamburg Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Dave Wilcox, June 6, 2012
5. Hamburg / Edwin B. Winans Marker and Hamburg Cemetery
Winans gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Tom Urich, June 10, 2012
6. Winans gravesite
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2011, by Tom Urich of Hamburg, Michigan. This page has been viewed 521 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 4, 2011, by Tom Urich of Hamburg, Michigan.   2. submitted on March 9, 2012, by Dave Wilcox of Grass Lake, Michigan.   3, 4. submitted on June 11, 2012, by Tom Urich of Hamburg, Michigan.   5. submitted on June 6, 2012, by Dave Wilcox of Grass Lake, Michigan.   6. submitted on June 11, 2012, by Tom Urich of Hamburg, Michigan. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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