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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Virginia Military Institute

 
 
Virginia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 21, 2012
1. Virginia Military Institute Marker
Inscription. A state military, engineering and arts college, founded in 1839. Graduates of it have taken a prominent part in every war since the Mexican War, 2,000 of them serving in the World War. The cadets fought as a corps at New Market in 1864. Among the members of the faculty were Stonewall Jackson and the noted scientist Matthew F. Maury and John M. Brooke.
 
Erected 1939 by Virginia Conservation Commission. (Marker Number I-1.)
 
Location. 37° 47.387′ N, 79° 26.043′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Virginia. Marker is on the Letcher Avenue Incline just from North Main Street (Business U.S. 11), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. It is in sight of the Crozet Monument, overlooking North Main Street. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington VA 24450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonel Claudius Crozet (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); VMI World War II Memorial (about 400 feet away); Jackson’s Classroom (about 500 feet away); General Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr.
Virginia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 18, 2011
2. Virginia Military Institute Marker
(about 600 feet away); Virginia Military Institute Historic District (about 600 feet away); Barracks     The Virginia Military Institute (about 600 feet away); Stonewall Jackson (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
Also see . . .
1. Virginia Military Institute. Wikipedia entry. “VMI produced some of America’s most significant commanders in World War II. The most important of these was George C. Marshall, the top U.S. Army general during the war. Marshall was the Army’s first five-star general and the only career military officer ever to win the Nobel Peace Prize. Winston Churchill dubbed Marshall the ‘Architect of Victory’ and ‘the greatest Roman of them all.’ The Deputy Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army during the war was also a VMI graduate as were the Second U.S. Army commander, 15th U.S. Army commander, the commander of Allied Air Forces of the Southwest Pacific and various Corps and Division commanders in the Army and Marine Corps. China’s General Sun Li-jen, known as the ‘Rommel of the East,’ was also a graduate of the VMI.” (Submitted on December 11, 2011.) 

2. Stonewall Jackson. Wikipedia entry. “In the
Virginia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 18, 2011
3. Virginia Military Institute Marker
North Main Street (U.S. Business 11) is down the hill on the right. Stono Lane is on the left.
spring of 1851, Jackson accepted a newly created teaching position at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), in Lexington, Virginia. He became Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy and Instructor of Artillery. Jackson’s teachings are still used at VMI today because they are timeless military essentials: discipline, mobility, assessing the enemy’s strength and intentions while attempting to conceal your own, and the efficiency of artillery combined with an infantry assault.” (Submitted on December 11, 2011.) 

3. Matthew Fontain Maury. Wikipedia entry. “Maury accepted a teaching position at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), holding the chair of physics. Maury advocated the creation of an agricultural college to complement VMI. This led to the establishment of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College (Virginia Tech) in Blacksburg, Virginia in 1872. Maury declined the offer to become its first president partly because of his age.” (Submitted on December 11, 2011.) 

4. John Mercer Brooke. Wikipedia entry. “Had it not been for Brooke's deep sea and core sampling device, the world would have had to wait on charting the floors of the undersea world and would not have had the undersea trans-atlantic cable for generations to come. ... in 1858 ... the Queen of the United
Virginia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 18, 2011
4. Virginia Military Institute Marker
The incline down to North Main Street with Foster Stadium on the left. Cocke Hall is just visible in the distance on the right.
Kingdom spoke to [U.S.] President Buchanan through the [new] transatlantic cable.” (Submitted on December 11, 2011.) 
 
Categories. EducationNotable Persons
 
Crozet Hall at the Virginia Military Institute image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 18, 2011
5. Crozet Hall at the Virginia Military Institute
View from the marker
Benoit Claudius Crozet (1789–1864) image. Click for full size.
by William Garl Brown via Wikipedia Commons
6. Benoit Claudius Crozet (1789–1864)
Claudius Crozet, a VMI founder, was a French civil engineer who immigrated to the U.S. and, among many other accomplishments, built the then longest railroad tunnel in the country through the Blue Ridge Mountains without the use of dynamite.
Stonewall Jackson<br>Thomas Jonathan Jackson (1829–1863) image. Click for full size.
Wikimedia Commons Collection
7. Stonewall Jackson
Thomas Jonathan Jackson (1829–1863)
Matthew Fontaine Maury, USN (1806–1873) image. Click for full size.
By J.S. Penderson, Library of Congress Collection via Wikipedia Commons, 1855
8. Matthew Fontaine Maury, USN (1806–1873)
John Mercer Brooke (1826–1906) image. Click for full size.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Collection, 1858
9. John Mercer Brooke (1826–1906)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 10, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 588 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 21, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 10, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on December 11, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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