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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Coatesville in Chester County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Modern Mill

The Lukens National Historic District

 
 
The Modern Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, August 31, 2011
1. The Modern Mill Marker
Inscription. In 1927 a new 84" mill was installed, replacing the old 84" mill of the 1870s. It could produce plates as thin as 1/8" and up to 72" wide. Also in 1927, Lukens formed the By-Products Steel Company, a subsidiary established to provide partial fabrication before shipment, using the techniques of shearing, flame cutting, bending and pressing. A second subsidiary, Lukenweld, was established in 1930. It was the first commercial weldery set up in America to specialize in the design & fabrication of steel plate structures by welding. In 1930, Lukens introduced clad plate, involving bonding two or more different types of metal. World War II brought expansions as Lukens, in partnership with the United States Navy, constructed the 120" mill. During the war, the 206" continued to turn out heavy armor plate for the military's needs. Lukens employees, called "Lukenites", topped 6,000 in 1943 and reached a record 6,166 in 1944. Women were brought in to work in the steel manufacturing divisions on October 1, 1942. 2,000 employees served in World War II, and 57 gave their lives. On March 27, 1942, Lukens was honored by the United States Navy with the Navy "E" Award for outstanding production achievement. In 1953, the United States Navy announced plans for building a new armor plate plant at Lukens. In 1957 ground was broken for a new steel making facility
The Modern Mill Marker Close-Up image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, August 31, 2011
2. The Modern Mill Marker Close-Up
centering on a 100-ton electric furnace which would later be known as A Furnace. In 1958, a new 140" slabbing and roughing mill, known as the S&R Mill, was brought on line with its 9 soaking pits. A second 100-ton electric furnace, known as B Furnace, was built in 1962, followed in 1964 by a third furnace, C Furnace, with a 150-ton capacity. Lukens developed a computerize operator guide control system, the first to be applied to electric furnaces of this size. In 1970 the company completed construction of a strand casting facility which shortens the production of slabs by eliminating the pouring of molten steel in the molds to form ingots and then rolling the ingots into slabs. With the casting process, molten steel is run directly from the ladle into the casting machine, solidifying as it descends. In 1972 construction began on a fourth furnace, D Furnace, with a 150-ton capacity, upgraded to a capacity of 165 tons in 1984. The Open Hearth furnaces were finally phased out of operation by 1975. In 1975 Lukens became the first steel company in the United States to receive national nuclear certification from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In 1978 Lukens purchased the 110" Rolling Mill formerly owned by the Alan Wood Steel Company in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania.
 
Erected by Graystone Society.
 
Location.
View of the Marker in Front of the Parking Lot image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, August 31, 2011
3. View of the Marker in Front of the Parking Lot
39° 58.892′ N, 75° 49.4′ W. Marker is in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, in Chester County. Marker is on 50 South 1st Avenue 0.1 miles south of The Lincoln Highway (Pennsylvania Route 82), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is located to the rear left of the main building, to the right of the walkway leading to the rear parking lot, stuck into the grass. Marker is in this post office area: Coatesville PA 19320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Lukens Mill - Early 1900s (within shouting distance of this marker); Lukens Executive Office Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Charles Lukens Huston House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lukens Mill - Late 1800s (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles Lukens Huston House Site (about 300 feet away); Graystone - Abram Francis Huston House (about 300 feet away); Terracina (about 400 feet away); Brandywine Mansion (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coatesville.
 
More about this marker. Photos of Robert W. Wolcott and Charles L. Huston, Jr., principal executives of the burgeoning steel business are located at the top left of the marker. The bottom left, features a map of the Coatesville office and plant facilities and a smaller
Modern Mill Marker w/ Lukens Executive Offices in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, August 31, 2011
4. Modern Mill Marker w/ Lukens Executive Offices in the Background
The Lukens Office Building (seen in the background) is a contributing structure to the Lukens Historic District. The office building is well maintained and still is as beautiful today as it was when it was first constructed in 1902
map of the Conshohocken office and plant facilities. The bottom middle contains a birds eye view of the plant in the mid-1950s. The bottom right corner offers a look into a manufacturing area, giving a peek at a strand casting facility in action.
 
Also see . . .
1. NRHP nomination form for the Lukens Historic District. This is the official document submitted to the NPS for NRHP consideration complete with narratives and anecdotes for the history and all contributing structures to the historic district. (Submitted on December 17, 2011, by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey.) 

2. Lukens Historic District - Official Site (locally maintained). Self-promoting website to engage and educate visitors and promote tourism. (Submitted on December 17, 2011, by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 17, 2011, by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 345 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 17, 2011, by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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