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Wrightsville in York County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wrightsville

 
 
Wrightsville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, January 26, 2008
1. Wrightsville Marker
Inscription. Gateway to the West - Wrightsville was settled in the 1720s by Quakers, including the John Wright family. Wright established a ferry and Wrightsville became a major point of crossing the Susquehanna River by pioneers traveling west. In 1811 Jacob Kline laid out the original 101 lots. The following year 96 lots known as "Westphalia" were laid out by Susannah Wright Houston. By 1814 the first wooden covered bridge was completed. Wrightsville and "Westphalia" joined to form Wrightsville Boro in 1834.

With the advent of railroads and The Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal in the 1840s, Wrightsville's growth continued. Industries began to flourish. Quarries supplied stone for building and for making lime. Brickyards, lumberyards, sawmills, iron foundries, cigar factories, a silk mill and sewing factories provided employment. Several operated well into the 20tgh century.

In the mid 19th century, slaves on the Underground Railroad reached freedom as they passed thru Wrightsville. On June 28, 1863, a Civil War skirmish between Confederate and Union forces culminated with the destruction, by fire of the world's longest covered bridge forcing the Confederates westward into the fateful battles at Gettysburg.

While Wrightsville no longer has railroads, trolleys, ferry boats and canal boats, the Wright's Ferry Bridge (Rt.30)
Wrightsville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 27, 2010
2. Wrightsville Marker
Behind the marker are two World War II-era field pieces on the grounds of the American Legion. The guns are 57-mm anti-tank guns.
and Veteran's Memorial Bridge (Rt 462) continue to make Wrightsville a busy east/west crossing of the Susquehanna River.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal marker series.
 
Location. 40° 1.535′ N, 76° 31.751′ W. Marker is in Wrightsville, Pennsylvania, in York County. Marker is at the intersection of Lincoln Highway (Pennsylvania Route 462) and Hellam Street, on the right when traveling east on Lincoln Highway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wrightsville PA 17368, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. American Legion Monument (a few steps from this marker); Gettysburg Campaign (a few steps from this marker); Veterans Memorial Bridge (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal (approx. 0.2 miles away); Springetsbury Manor (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hosting the Invader (approx. 0.2 miles away); Burning the Wrightsville Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away); The River: a Corridor and a Barrier (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wrightsville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wrightsville Facts and Figures from Wikipedia.
Diorama - Burning of the Bridge June 28, 1863 image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, January 26, 2008
3. Diorama - Burning of the Bridge June 28, 1863
Museum building is located on Hellam Street. It is open Sundays and on other special occasions.
(Submitted on January 30, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
2. Welcome to Wrightsville Borough. Official Website (Submitted on July 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAbolition & Underground RRBridges & ViaductsColonial EraIndustry & CommerceMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PersonsRailroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
John Wright, Jr. Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Dianne Bowders, August 2, 2007
4. John Wright, Jr. Tavern
Wrightsville, Veterans Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Dianne Bowders, February 7, 2008
5. Wrightsville, Veterans Memorial Bridge
This continuous arch cement bridge once held the honor for being the longest of its kind.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 29, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,840 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 29, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2. submitted on June 12, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on January 29, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on February 25, 2010, by Dianne Bowders of York, PA.
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