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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Diego in San Diego County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

“Star of India”

 

—[Maritime Museum of San Diego] —

 
“Star of India” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller
1. “Star of India” Marker
Inscription.
The “Star of India,” a three masted bark, is the oldest iron-hulled merchant ship afloat. Built on the Isle of Man, Great Britain, she was launched in 1863 and christened “Euterpe”, the trans-Pacific trade from 1871-1898 resulted in the “Euterpe” circumnavigating the earth twenty-one times, stopping in San Francisco in 1873 and 1883, she was purchased by the Alaska Packers Association to service the salmon canneries in Alaska, leaving each season from Alameda during 1902-1923, “Euterpe” was renamed “Star of India”. “Star of India” continues to sail the Pacific ocean as an active reminder of early California’s maritime commerce.

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 1030

Plaque placed by the State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the Maritime Museum of San Diego and the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus, Squibob Chapter, August 1999.
 
Erected 1999 by California Department of Parks and Recreation. (Marker Number 1030.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 32° 43.216′ N, 117° 10.41′ W. Marker is in San
“Star of India” at the Maritime Museum of San Diego image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller
2. “Star of India” at the Maritime Museum of San Diego
Diego, California, in San Diego County. Marker is on North Harbor Drive north of West Ash Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1492 North Harbor Drive, San Diego CA 92101, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ferryboat "Berkeley" (within shouting distance of this marker); Lane Field Ballpark Site (approx. 0.3 miles away); Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone (approx. 0.4 miles away); United States Aircraft Carrier Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Clifton A. F. Sprague, Vice Admiral, USN (approx. half a mile away); USS San Diego Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Tuna Fleet Service, World War II (1941-1945) (approx. 0.6 miles away); San Diego Barracks (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Diego.
 
More about this marker. The “Star of India” is one of several vintage vessels moored at the wharf of the Maritime Museum of San Diego.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
“Star of India” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller
3. “Star of India” Marker
The “Star of India”, the three-masted bark, originally known as “Euterpe” image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 7, 2011
4. The “Star of India”, the three-masted bark, originally known as “Euterpe”
- viewed from Harbor Drive off her port quarter.
Star of India image. Click for full size.
By Western Publishing & Novelty Co. Los Angeles, Calif., circa 1970's
5. Star of India
Launched in 1863 the "Star of India" is the oldest Iron Sailing Vessel afloat. The square rigged ship has had a varied history and will now give the visitors to San Diego and the people of San Diego a first class Marine Museum. This grand old lady can be seen at the foot of Broadway adding a great deal to San Diego's "Harbor of the Sun."
Star of India image. Click for full size.
By Road Runner Card Company, San Diego, Calif., circa 1970's
6. Star of India
The Star of India, which was launched in 1863, is the oldest merchant vessel still afloat. To visit her is to gain a rare sense of the life aboard sailing ships of a century ago.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 23, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 638 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 23, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on January 4, 2012. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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