Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Martinez in Contra Costa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

John Muir Home

 
 
John Muir Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
1. John Muir Home Marker
Inscription. Ranch home of John Muir 1838- 1914, explorer, naturalist, author and foremost advocate of forest protection and of national parks. The John Muir Trail through the High Sierra, Muir Woods National Monument and Muir Glacier in Alaska are named for him.
 
Erected by Department of Public Works – Division of Highways. (Marker Number 312.)
 
Location. 37° 59.526′ N, 122° 7.855′ W. Marker is in Martinez, California, in Contra Costa County. Marker can be reached from Alhambra Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located at the front of the visitor center at the John Muir National Historic Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4202 Alhambra Avenue, Martinez CA 94553, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Vicente Martinez Adobe (here, next to this marker); The Vicente Martinez Adobe - 1849 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Birthplace of The Martini (approx. 1.6 miles away); 624 Talbart Street (approx. 1.7 miles away); 605, 607 & 615 Talbart (approx. 1.7 miles away); 535 Talbart (approx. 1.7 miles away); State Theatre (approx. 1.7 miles away); Hilson's (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Martinez.
 
Regarding John Muir Home. This home was built by John Muir's father-in-law, Dr. John Strenzel, in 1882. Muir and his wife Louie lived about a mile away in
John Muir Home and the Vicente Martinez Adobe Markers image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
2. John Muir Home and the Vicente Martinez Adobe Markers
a Dutch colonial style home from 1880 until the death of his father-in-law in 1890. During this time Muir managed both the Muir and Strentzel fruit ranches. After Dr. Strenzel's death Muir, Louie and their two daughters moved into this house.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. John Muir Memorial Park in Endeavor, Wisconsin "The Land of His Youth"
 
Also see . . .
1. Who Was John Muir?. The Sierra Club gives information on his accomplishments with links to his biography, tributes, writings, etc.
John Muir was America's most famous and influential naturalist and conservationist. He is one of California's most important historical personalities. He has been called "The Father of our National Parks," "Wilderness Prophet," and "Citizen of the Universe." (Submitted on December 30, 2011.) 

2. John Muir National Historic Site. The National Park Service website for the John Muir National Historic Site. Includes photos, activities and general information. (Submitted on January 11, 2012.) 
 
Categories. EducationExplorationHorticulture & ForestryNotable Persons
 
John Muir National Historical Site Markers and Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
3. John Muir National Historical Site Markers and Visitor Center
John Muir Home image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
4. John Muir Home
Water Storage image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
5. Water Storage
The brick addition was added to the back of the house in the 1890's by John Muir to enclose a 2,500 gallon tank in the attic. There were originally two water tanks in the house and a large cistern beneath the kitchen floor. From the John Muir Historic Site Tour Brochure.
West Parlor image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
6. West Parlor
John Muir entertained his guests in this formal parlor. Muir's wife, Louie, was a superb hostess and a pianist of concert caliber.
A Muir Family Christmas image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
7. A Muir Family Christmas
Rather than a customary pine tree, it is thought that the Muir family would cut a large branch from a local tree to serve as the family Christmas Tree. A Bay-Laurel was on display as a representation.
Fire Places image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
8. Fire Places
The rooms were heated by seven fire places similar to this one located in the Library.
Staircase image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
9. Staircase
This staircase in the main hall of the house leads to the second story. Located on the second floor are family and guest bedrooms and Muir's Study.
John Muir's Study image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
10. John Muir's Study
In this room, which he called his "scribble den" he wrote many of his books and articles.
Exhibit on Display in the Attic image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
11. Exhibit on Display in the Attic
John Muir Exhibit
Originally created for the
Kern Kaweah Chapter
Mineral King Group
of the
Sierra Club
Produced in 1993 to create interest in John Muir and the recently established John Muir Day, this exhibit was exhibited in California for many years by dedicated Sierra Club volunteers. The design of the exhibit is meant to reflect the times when Muir was alive, and built as Muir himself might have built it. John Muir was an inventor, and lived at a time before mass production, plastics, and chrome were everywhere in our lives. Corrugated cardboard was used as an alternative. Corrugated, largely made of recycled materials, is lightweight and gives a "natural" look and feel to the exhibit.
The Attic image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
12. The Attic
Stairs Leading to the Bell Tower image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
13. Stairs Leading to the Bell Tower
Caution!
Only five persons should be in the Bell Tower at a time. Duck your head as you the climb the stairs.
View From the Bell Tower image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
14. View From the Bell Tower
Note that the view is above the top of the chimney. Muir would often use the tower for quiet meditation during the quiet early morning hours of summer.
The Bell image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
15. The Bell
John Strentzel may have used the bell in the tower to summon the laborers to work. Visitors are invited to ring the bell but are warned "Be sure to cover your ears!". It is confirmed that the bell is very loud!.
Franklin Creek image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
16. Franklin Creek
The creek was named after Edward Franklin, who bought the Martinez Adobe from Vicente Martinez in 1853. This bridge is a replica of the one washed away in floods. The Martinez Adobe is behind this view and the Muir House is behind the trees at the top of the hill in the background.
The Martinez Adobe image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
17. The Martinez Adobe
View of the Martinez Adobe from near the bridge crossing Franklin Creek.
John Muir Home image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, December 21, 2011
18. John Muir Home
John Muir Statue at John Muir National Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Ken Horn, August 31, 2014
19. John Muir Statue at John Muir National Historic Site
Located at the Visitor Center that is in front of the John Muir Home and grounds.
The Muirs' Knabe Piano image. Click for full size.
By Ken Horn, August 31, 2014
20. The Muirs' Knabe Piano
In the west parlor of the John Muir Home.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 30, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 891 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. submitted on December 30, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   19, 20. submitted on December 4, 2015, by Ken Horn of Springfield, Missouri.
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