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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hibbing in St. Louis County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Moving the Town

 
 
Moving the Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
1. Moving the Town Marker
Inscription. Many of the homes were not owned by the occupants. When it came time to move them, they were offered the opportunity to buy the house for $1.00.

They would then have to arrange to move them at their own expense. Many businesses were also moved.

It was quite an achievement considering the equipment available in the 1920's and 1930's. Not all the buildings survived the journey.
 
Location. 47° 26.696′ N, 92° 56.39′ W. Marker is near Hibbing, Minnesota, in St. Louis County. Marker is on Lincoln Street east of 2nd Avenue North, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker can be reached from Greyhound Boulevard/3rd Avenue East. Marker is in this post office area: Hibbing MN 55746, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Business District (here, next to this marker); Frank Hibbing (here, next to this marker); Schools (here, next to this marker); Carnegie Library (here, next to this marker); Oliver Club (here, next to this marker); Finnish Workers Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Oliver Mining Co. Headquarters / Oliver Shop Laboratory
Moving the Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
2. Moving the Town Marker
The open pit mine is located just beyond this marker.
(about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Train Depot / Street Car Bridge (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hibbing.
 
Regarding Moving the Town. The nearby Hull-Rust Mine began mining operations in 1896. The Village of Hibbing grew up near this mine pit. In 1918 all the buildings in the northern section of town were mounted on steel wheels and moved two miles to the south to make room for the mine's expansion.
 
Also see . . .  Historical Information. "Hibbing grew rapidly in its early years as the huge iron ore mines such as the Mahoning, Hull Rust, Sellers and Burt provided the raw material for Americas industrial revolution. In fact, the mines encroached on the village from the east, north and south and it was determined that some of the ore body actually went under the town whose population had hit 20,000 by 1915." (Submitted on February 3, 2008.) 
 
Additional keywords. North Hibbing
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Abandoned North Hibbing image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
3. Abandoned North Hibbing
Lincoln Street at Second Avenue; several foundations and streets remain.
1910 Map of Hibbing image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
4. 1910 Map of Hibbing
The red dot was the location of Lincoln High School and the present-day marker.
Typical Homes image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
5. Typical Homes
The early men working the mines were poor immigrants and were unable to afford to build a home.
The Oliver Iron Mining Company built some houses and rented them to the workers.
Later, some of the families were able to build their own houses. These houses were typical miners homes and were located here on Lincoln Street (top four), and Washington Street one block north (bottom two).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 3, 2008, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 1,642 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 3, 2008, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   4, 5. submitted on February 5, 2008, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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