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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Robert E. Lee

1807 – 1870

 
 
Robert E. Lee Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 26, 2011
1. Robert E. Lee Marker
Inscription.
Commander in Chief
Confederate States of America
1861 – 1865
Placed by
Julia Jackson Chapter No. 4
Children of the Confederacy

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been permanently removed. It was located near 29° 56.6′ N, 90° 4.347′ W. Marker was in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker was on Lee Circle near Howard Avenue. Touch for map. The Robert E. Lee Memorial was located in the circle at the 900 block of Saint Charles Avenue. Marker was at or near this postal address: 900 Saint Charles Avenue, New Orleans LA 70130, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. St. Charles Line (within shouting distance of this marker); 8 in. Columbaid Cannon (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Atlantic Wall Fragments (about 500 feet away); The Beginning (about 600 feet away); Margaret's Place and Walk / Lower Garden District (approx. 0.2 miles away); Julia Row (approx. 0.2 miles away); Starting Point of the First Traditional New Orleans Mardi Gras Parade
Robert E. Lee Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 26, 2011
2. Robert E. Lee Marker
(approx. mile away); St. Theresa of Avila Church (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
More about this marker. The actual statue of Lee is 16 feet, 6 inches tall, standing on an 8-foot, 4-inch base. The base is on the 90 foot pedestal which is said to have a winding staircase within it. The 1884 bronze was by New York sculptor Alexander Doyle. The base and pedestal by John Roy.
 
Also see . . .  Louisiana's Civil War Museum at Confederate Memorial Hall. (Submitted on January 13, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Robert E. Lee Statue image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 26, 2011
3. Robert E. Lee Statue
Robert E. Lee image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Robert E. Lee
This 1864-65 painting of Robert E. Lee by Edward Caledon Bruce hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Robert E. lee was born into a family prominent in Virginia society and early American politics. A young man with an intense desire to prove himself, he attained the highest rank available to cadets and graduated from West Point in 1829. Initially, lee opposed both secession and war. But when Virginia voted to secede from the Union, he resigned from the U.s. Army and went to his native state's defense. Placed in command of the Army of Northern Virginia in June 1862, lee gave the Confederacy moments of hope with several early victories. His army was always severely outnumbered, so it was a triumph that he managed to keep it on the field for the duration of the war. By 1864, however, time and resources were working against him, and in May, Ulysses S. Grant became his last and fateful adversary.” - National Portrait Gallery
Confederate Memorial Hall. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 26, 2011
5. Confederate Memorial Hall.
The Confederate Memorial Hall contains Louisiana's Civil War Museum. It is just off Lee Circle.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 30, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 13, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 831 times since then and 172 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 13, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   4. submitted on July 19, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5. submitted on January 13, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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