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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anderson in Anderson County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Lebanon Baptist Church

est. 1815

 
 
Lebanon Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
1. Lebanon Baptist Church Marker
Inscription.
At the Site of the
Old Lebanon Church Cemetery.
Relocated to Present Site in 1860.
Present Sanctuary Built in 1911.

 
Location. 34° 37.1′ N, 82° 41.383′ W. Marker is in Anderson, South Carolina, in Anderson County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Gentry Road and Sanders Road. Touch for map. Marker is located on the church exterior, near the west (main) entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5150 Gentry Street, Anderson SC 29621, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Joseph B. Douthit (approx. 2.1 miles away); Richard W. Simpson (approx. 3 miles away); Sandy Springs Camp Ground / Confederate Muster Ground (approx. 3.5 miles away); Willis Chapel Methodist Church (approx. 3.9 miles away); Old Hopewell Cemetery (approx. 4.4 miles away); Hopewell Church (approx. 4.9 miles away); M42A1 "Duster" (approx. 5.4 miles away but has been reported missing); The Anderson Sports and Entertainment Complex (approx. 5.4 miles away); Barnard Elliott Bee (approx. 5.5 miles away); Thomas Green Clemson (approx. 5.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anderson.
 
Also see . . .  Lebanon Baptist Church.
Lebanon Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
2. Lebanon Baptist Church Marker
Official website of Lebanon Baptist Church. (Submitted on January 30, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. A Brief History of Lebanon Baptist Church by Lewis Moorhead
According to the minutes of the Saluda Association, Lebanon Church was constituted in 1815, but of its organization and early history very little is definitely known. Its first location was three miles east from Pendleton, on the Anderson Road, near the residence of the late Thomas Dixon, where it remained for forty-five years, which site is still marked by an antiquated grave yard with its many moss-covered head and foot stones.

It united with the Saluda Association in 1816, being represented by Jesse Lewis and Moody Burt. In possession of the present clerk, we found an old deed to two acres of land, deeded by Joseph Taylor in 1822 to Major Moody Burt, Jesse Lewis and Archibald Patterson who were supposed to be the then deacons of the church.

The only records of the Church's new extant prior to the year 1880 begins with March 6, 1824, and closes with June 7, 1834. This old book contains a short,
comprehensive view of the Baptist Faith, as held by the Lebanon Church, set forth in nine articles. Aside from its valuable
Lebanon Baptist Church<br>West Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
3. Lebanon Baptist Church
West Corner
records, it is a relic well worth preserving. It is made of foolscap, sewed together with a home-tanned leather sting, and covered with blue checked homespun with paper stiffening. In his letter to the association the clerk mentions a former book which he speaks of as being badly mutilated and laments the fact that the records have been so very badly kept. At that time the total membership numbered only thirty-eight.

On April the 3rd, 1824, an advisory council was called in, consisting of Sanford Vandiver, James Morehead and Micajah Webb, to look over a settlement between A. Patterson and Jesse Lewis. Instead of brother going to law with brother, which is positively forbidden in the scripture, this was their method of settling all their difficulties. In June of the same year Sylvanus Minton was elected clerk. On March 5, 1825, the church recalled a letter granted to James Mays on October 2, 1824, and excluded him for leaving his debts unsettled. In October following William Reatherford was granted permission to exercise in public prayer and exhortation, "but not to preach."

Who was the pastor during the first seventeen years of the Church's existence is not known. The records of the eight years over which we have gone say absolutely nothing as to who was pastor. At the December conference in 1832, Drury Hutchens was elected assistant pastor, who, in the following
Lebanon Baptist Church Steeple image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
4. Lebanon Baptist Church Steeple
February became the regular pastor; but who his predecessors were is not stated.

In June 1833, it was agreed to comply with the request of the Association by sending up to the next meeting of that body a historical sketch of the Church from its organization up to that time and their Pastor, Drury Hutchens, was requested to prepare it. At the September meeting, Sylvanus Minton was ordained to the full functions of the Gospel ministry by a presbytery consisting of the following: Elders Drury Hutchens, William McGee and Jas. H. Hembree. In October, Presley G. Cobb was elected clerk and requested to take charge of all the books and papers belonging to the church.

The leading spirits in the Church during this period were Moody and Francis Burt, Jesse Lewis, A. Patterson, Aaron and Whitaker Smith, Anthony Dickenson and S. Minton. During this decade the Church enjoyed a good degree of prosperity and is noted as a period of peace and harmony among the members. Frequently the only record made of a conference meeting was "Church met and all in peace."

Of the workings of the Church for the next half a century, very little is known, save a long list of pastors, which followed each other in rapid succession. The following ministers served the Church as pastor from 1834 to 1880: From 1834 to 1836, inclusive, Drury Hutchens; from 1837 to 1838, James H. Hembree; in 1839,
Lebanon Baptist Church<br>Southwest Window Panes image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
5. Lebanon Baptist Church
Southwest Window Panes
Joseph Greshem; in 1840, Thomas Dawson; from 1841 to 1845, Robert King; from 1846 to 1848, Bryan Burress; from 1849 to 1850, James Wilson; in 1851, L.R.L.
Jennings; from 1852 to 1863, David Simmons; from 1864 to 1866, W. Berry Long; in 1867, J.S. Murray; from 1868 to 1869, W.M. Ramply; from 1870 to 1871, David Simmons; from 1872 to 1874, Hamilton Hays; from 1875 to 1878, E.R. Carswell; from 1879 to 1880, I.W. Wingo.

While there were no remarkable revivals attended with fabulous in gatherings, yet the growth was steady and development permanent. In 1840, Thomas Dawson baptized nineteen and during W.B. Long's pastorate of three years, he received forty-nine by baptism, while E.R. Carswell's ministrations, during the first year were blessed with thirty-five accessions to the church.

In 1860, the organization was removed to the present beautiful location, which is some three or four miles east from the old site and the present commodious house of worship erected at an approximate cost of 1,500.00. This caused some dissatisfaction on the part of some of the members, who continued to meet at the old house and claimed to be the Church of Lebanon. Two letters were sent to the Association in 1861, but after considerable discussion the party worshiping in the new house having a majority was recognized as the Lebanon Church. The old house remained intact for twenty
Lebanon Baptist Church<br>Bell Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
6. Lebanon Baptist Church
Bell Tower
years, and during a part of that time irregular services were kept up there by neighboring pastors. It was sold in 1881 with the understanding that the proceeds would be used in keeping up the old grave yard.
    — Submitted January 30, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Lebanon Baptist Church<br>Bell Tower image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
7. Lebanon Baptist Church
Bell Tower
Left Plaque: Bell, Lebanon School 1861-1969
Right Plaque: Tower Erected in Memory of Janie & Chessley Murphy by son S. Ansel Murphy
Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
8. Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery
Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 22, 2003
9. Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery
Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
10. Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery
Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
11. Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery
Charles & Annie Welborn Plot image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
12. Charles & Annie Welborn Plot
Charles Welborn Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
13. Charles Welborn Tombstone
May 9, 1918
Sept. 4, 1975
Son of
John D. & Adelia Burress Welborn
Married
Annie Maurie Schrimp
Aug. 6, 1947


Their Children:
Charles Jr.
Annie Laurie
Hugh Wingo
Jean Adelia


Served in World War II
Counter Intelligence Corps
July 28, 1942 - Dec. 9, 1945

A Good Citizen
A Christian Gentleman
A Devoted Husband and Father
A Prominent Anderson Attorney
Annie Laurie S. Welborn Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
14. Annie Laurie S. Welborn Tombstone
March 10, 1922
March 2, 2004
Daughter of
Eugene K. & Annie C. Schrimp
Married
Charles Welborn
Aug. 6, 1947


Their Children:
Chuck
Ann
Hugh
Jean


1st Female Court Reported in S.C.
Avid Traveler
Proud Grandmother of 11

A Good Citizen
A Southern Christian Lady
A Devoted Wife and Mother
A Dignified Strength to Family
Mell & Lula Welborn, M.D. Plot image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
15. Mell & Lula Welborn, M.D. Plot
Mell Burress Welborn, M.D. Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
16. Mell Burress Welborn, M.D. Tombstone
September 8, 1907
April 23, 1982
Son of
John Ducworth Welborn
and
Adelia Burress Welborn
Married
Lula Thacker
September 12, 1932


Their Children:
Mell Burress Welborn, Jr., M.D.
Thomas Harper Welborn

Their Grandchildren
Mell Burress Welborn III

Governor, American College of Surgeons
Staff, Welborn Baptist Hospital
Welborn Clinic
Evansville, Indiana
[Sons of American Revolution Medal]
Lula Thacker Welborn Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
17. Lula Thacker Welborn Tombstone
October 2, 1909
September 19, 2004
Daughter of
Hiram Thacker
and
Mary Thacker
Married
Mell Burress Welborn, M.D.
September 12, 1932


Their Children
Mell Burress Welborn Jr., M.D.
Thomas Harper Welborn


Their Grandchildren
Mell Burress Welborn III, M.D.

Great Grandmother to
Luke Burress and John Byrnes Welborn
Dedicated Community Volunteer
Enthusiastic Traveler
[Daughters of the American Revolution Medal]
J.D. & Adelia B. Welborn Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
18. J.D. & Adelia B. Welborn Tombstone
J.D. Welborn
Apr. 1, 1876 May 29, 1956
and
Adelia B. Welborn
Feb. 7, 1879 June 12, 1943

A Devoted Couple
and Affectionate Patents.
Their Lives
Were Consecrated to
Their Family
Friends, Community
And In The Service
Of The Master.
A.N. Richardson Tombstone<br>Front image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
19. A.N. Richardson Tombstone
Front
A.N. Richardson Tombstone<br>Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
20. A.N. Richardson Tombstone
Reverse
Son of
Noah Richardson
and
Hester Murphy
Mar. 26, 1847
Feb. 26, 1925
Joined Hopewell Baptist Church 1877. Served as Deacon and was Clerk for 38 years. Volunteered & served as Seargent Co. F, S.C. Reserves in the Confederate Army. Christian and Soldier. He was Guide, Philosopher, and Friend to the children of M.B. Richardson. His life was one of service to others.
Dr. J.G. Ducworth Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
21. Dr. J.G. Ducworth Tombstone
Nov. 8, 1848
Feb. 10, 1909
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 30, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 753 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21. submitted on January 30, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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