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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Piffard in Livingston County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A-cn-do-wa-nuh

 
 
A-cn-do-wa-nuh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, June 25, 2011
1. A-cn-do-wa-nuh Marker
Inscription. Site of
A-cn-do-wa-nuh
(Big Tree)
Seneca Indian Village
 
Erected 1947 by New York State Education Department.
 
Location. 42° 47.889′ N, 77° 51.709′ W. Marker is near Piffard, New York, in Livingston County. Marker is on River Road (County Road 19) 1.7 miles north of Canandaigua Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Piffard NY 14533, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Boyd – Parker (approx. 1 miles away); O-ha-gi (approx. 1 miles away); The International Society of Arboriculture and the National Arborist Association (approx. 1 miles away); Routes of the Armies (approx. 1 miles away); Genesee Castle (approx. 1 miles away); This wayside shrine marks the place (approx. 1 miles away); National Hotel (approx. 1.6 miles away); Village Square (approx. 2.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Per the Bulletin - New York State Museum of Natural History, New York State Museum, New York State Museum and Science Service: "Gaundowaneh or Big Tree was a Seneca village on a hill one mile north of Cuylerville. It was on the
Wide view of the A-cn-do-wa-nuh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, June 25, 2011
2. Wide view of the A-cn-do-wa-nuh Marker
west side of the river on the farm of EP Slocum in Leicester and was the last town occupied by the Senecas.
"

The 100 ft tall Swamp White Oak which marked the location of the Seneca indian village stood on east bank of the Genesee River until it fell into river in 1857. A section of the 27 foot circumstance trunk has been preserved in nearby Geneseo.

The Treaty of Big Tree conference was held in a meadow on the east bank of the Genesee River, opposite the indian village.
 
Also see . . .
1. Genesee Country Magazine: Treaty of Big Tree 1797-1997. Major treaty opened Genesee region to peaceful settlement. (Submitted on February 4, 2012, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.) 

2. The Treaty of Big Tree (1794). (Submitted on February 4, 2012, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
View of the area of A-cn-do-wa-nuh image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, June 25, 2011
3. View of the area of A-cn-do-wa-nuh
Looking from the western rim of the Genesee Valley over the site of the A-cn-do-wa-nuh (Big Tree) Seneca indian village and across the Genesee River toward to the modern day village of Geneseo.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 4, 2012, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page has been viewed 561 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 4, 2012, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of the section of Big Tree trunk on display at the Geneseo Historical Museum • Can you help?
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