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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Runyon

 
 
Fort Runyon Marker image. Click for full size.
February 9, 2008
1. Fort Runyon Marker
Inscription.
Historical Site
Defenses of Washington
1861-1865
Fort Runyon

A half-mile to the southwest stood Fort Runyon, a large bastioned earthwork constructed in May 1861 to protect the Long Bridge over the Potomac. Its perimeter, 1484 yards, was about the same as that of the Pentagon. After the construction of the Arlington Line two miles to the west, Fort Runyon fell into disuse. Nearby Fort Jackson, at the Virginia end of the Long Bridge, was no more than a checkpoint to control traffic on the bridge and protect it from sabotage.
 
Erected 1965 by Arlington County, Virginia. (Marker Number 5.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.191′ N, 77° 2.705′ W. Marker is in Arlington, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker is at the intersection of Clark Street and Boundary Channel Drive, on the right when traveling north on Clark Street. Touch for map. Marker is located on Clark Street which is the terminus of Old Jefferson Davis Highway at Boundary Channel Drive. Marker is in this post office area: Arlington VA 22202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Navy and Marine Memorial
Fort Runyon Marker image. Click for full size.
February 9, 2008
2. Fort Runyon Marker
View to the east.
(approx. half a mile away); First Bloom (approx. 0.7 miles away in District of Columbia); Tomorrow is ours to win or lose (approx. 0.7 miles away in District of Columbia); Cuban Friendship Urn (approx. 0.7 miles away in District of Columbia); The Boundary Channel (approx. mile away); The Line of Duty (approx. mile away in District of Columbia); Defender of Liberty (approx. mile away in District of Columbia); Pentagon Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington.
 
More about this marker. In the center of the marker is a map of the Washington Defenses, with an arrow pointing out the location of Fort Runyon.
 
Additional comments.
1. Fort Runyon Particulars
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

The fort was named in honor of Brig. Gen. Theodore Runyon, of the New Jersey Brigade. Covering 12 acres of ground enclosed within a 1,484 yard perimeter, Fort Runyon rated as the largest of the Washington Forts. Built starting in May 1861, it was also among the first built. The Fort guarded the Virginia side of the Long Bridge (which crossed to the south of the modern railroad bridge). It also served to cover the Washington-Alexandria and Columbia Turnpikes.

As other forts were built and covered the approaches to sufficient depth, guns from Fort Runyon were relocated to more important sites. By the fall of 1862 it was being used more as a supply depot and corral. Armament was listed as one 8-inch seacoast howitzer and one 32-pdr gun at that time.

Units stationed at Fort Runyon over time included the 1st Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 2nd, 3rd, and 21st New Jersey Infantry, 13th New Hampshire Infantry, and 7th New York Militia.
    — Submitted February 9, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

2. Fort Jackson Particulars
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

Named for Jackson City, a failed development project from the 1850s. The fort stood about 50 yards south of the Metro Rail bridge. It was built to defend the Long Bridge and control bridge traffic. Little is recorded other than its use as a check point.
    — Submitted February 9, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2008. This page has been viewed 1,689 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 9, 2008. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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