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Near Nicholson in Wyoming County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tunkhannock Viaduct

 

—Placed on the National Register of Historic Places - 1977 —

 
Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
1. Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker
Inscription.
This reinforced concrete structure was the largest of its kind ever built when it went into service in 1915 on the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. The bridge, 2,375 feet long and rising 240 feet above Tunkhannock Creek, was the focal point of a 39.6 mile relocation between Clarks Summit and Hallstead. The novelist Theodore Dreiser called this viaduct "one of the true wonders of the world."
 
Erected 1995 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 41° 37.27′ N, 75° 46.714′ W. Marker is near Nicholson, Pennsylvania, in Wyoming County. Marker is on Lackawanna Trail (U.S. 11), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nicholson PA 18446, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. World War II Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Tunkhannock Viaduct (approx. 0.4 miles away); Galusha Grow (approx. 3.6 miles away); Hometown of Christy Mathewson (approx. 3.9 miles away); Christy Mathewson (approx. 4.3 miles away); Harris Hall Bell Memorial
Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
2. Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker
(approx. 4.3 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 4.3 miles away); Elder Miller (approx. 7.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nicholson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tunkhannock Viaduct - Wikipedia. (Submitted on February 24, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
2. Tunkhannock Viaduct - Explore PA History. (Submitted on February 24, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Once the Largest Concrete Structure in the World:
When the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad (DL&W) rerouted and straightened its main line in the early 1900s, the resulting realignment required deep cuts, high embankments, and massive bridges. Named for the creek it crosses, the Tunkhannock Viaduct, also known as Nicholson Viaduct because it towers above the town of Nicholson, north of Scranton. At one time it was the largest reinforced-concrete structure in the world.

At the dedication ceremonies on November 6, 1915, Pennsylvania Governer Martin C. Brumbaugh compared the Tunkhannock Viaduct to the Walnut Lane Bridge over the Wissahickon Creek in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park which,
Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
3. Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker
when it opened in December 1908, was hailed as the largest concrete bridge in the state. Walnut Lane's main span measured 233 feet long and rose 147 feet over the valley. You could put a dozen Walnut Street bridges under this monster and not notice them.”
    — Submitted February 24, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.

 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsIndustry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Tunkhannock Viaduct image. Click for full size.
JJ Young Jr. - Historical Society Archives
4. Tunkhannock Viaduct
Tunkhannock Viaduct image. Click for full size.
5. Tunkhannock Viaduct
Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 16, 2017
6. Tunkhannock Viaduct Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 480 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 24, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.   6. submitted on April 16, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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