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Hartford in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Harriet Beecher Stowe House

 
 
The Historical Marker Database - Add A Marker Step 2 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, February 1, 2012
1. The Historical Marker Database - Add A Marker Step 2 Marker
Inscription.
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Daughter of
The Reverend Lyman and Roxanna Foot Beecher
Born Litchfield Connecticut 14 June 1811
Married at Cincinnati Ohio 6 January 1836
To Calvin Ellis Stowe
Wrote "Uncle Tom's Cabin" at Brunswick Maine in 1851
Resided in this house from 1873
Until her death 1 July 1896
"As Columbus sought an old continent and discovered
a new one so Harriet Beecher Stowe meant to write
an argument on an old theme and succeeded in
writing an immortal classic."
William Lyon Phelps

[ lower plaque ]
This tablet placed by
The Hartford Colony
National Society
New England Women
13 June 1935

 
Erected 1935 by The Hartford Colony, National Society of New England Women.
 
Location. 41° 46.009′ N, 72° 42.012′ W. Marker is in Hartford, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is on Forrest Street 0.1 miles south of Farmington Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 77 Forrest Street, Hartford CT 06105, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Latin School (approx. 0.8 miles away); Major General Clarence Ransom Edwards DSM
Harriet Beecher Stowe House image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, February 1, 2012
2. Harriet Beecher Stowe House
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Andersonville Boy (approx. 0.9 miles away); Orville Hitchcock Platt (approx. 0.9 miles away); Joseph Roswell Hawley (approx. one mile away); Trinity College (approx. one mile away); Col. Thomas Knowlton (approx. one mile away); Marquis De La Fayette (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hartford.
 
Regarding Harriet Beecher Stowe House. The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center preserves and interprets Stowe's Hartford home and the Center's historic collections, promotes vibrant discussion of her life and work, and inspires commitment to social justice and positive change.
 
Also see . . .
1. Harriet Beecher Stowe on Wikipedia. (Submitted on March 3, 2012, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. (Submitted on March 3, 2012, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicWomen
 
Harriet Beecher Stowe Center image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, February 1, 2012
3. Harriet Beecher Stowe Center
Harriet Beecher Stowe House image. Click for full size.
circa 1905
4. Harriet Beecher Stowe House
Harriet Beecher Stowe image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
5. Harriet Beecher Stowe
This 1853 portrait of Harriet Beecher Stowe by Alanson Fisher hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Excluded from public professions, cultivated women sought other avenues for their talents. From discussing the issues of the day in informal salon gatherings, it was a short step for women to become writers, especially since the antebellum period saw a burgeoning number of magazines catering to women. So Harriet Beecher Stowe started a career that made her one of the most popular novelists of the nineteenth century. Stowe's place in American history was sealed with her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1851-52), which sold 300,000 copies in its first year. Uncle Tom's Cabin was a reform novel; Stowe was motivated to write it by the Fugitive Slave Law and the effect that slavery had in destroying the African American family. No more effective charge could be made in a nation that, both North and South, revered the family as the foundation of society.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2012, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 686 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 3, 2012, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   4. submitted on November 8, 2014.   5. submitted on August 10, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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