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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Britton's Neck in Marion County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Dunhamís Bluff: Control of the Rivers

 
 
Dunhamís Bluff: Control of the Rivers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
1. Dunhamís Bluff: Control of the Rivers Marker
Inscription. From the time Col. Francis Marion took control of the Williamsburg Militia in August 1780 until the following spring, a network of camps in the area where the Great Pee Dee, Little Pee Dee, and Lynches Rivers meet formed a base of operations for his campaign to undermine the British occupation of South Carolina. From here, Marion attacked vital supply lines between Charleston and Camden and worked to neutralize the areaís loyalist militia forces.

Sometime in early 1781, Marion ordered Col. John Ervin, a leader of the Whig militia on Brittonís Neck, to construct a redoubt, or earthen fortification, here at Dunhamís Bluff. The redoubt served as a lookout post to monitor traffic on the Great Pee Dee and as a defensive position against light opposition. A large campsite located a short distance from here housed a garrison of militiamen.

A generation after the Revolutionary War, South Carolinaís official geographer wrote that “by having control of the rivers, [Marion] could be abundantly supplied with provisions, and his post completely inaccessible except by water.” While probably exaggerating the extent of Marionís strength, the statement does reflect the way he attempted to use the natural environment to his advantage ~ and the strategic importance of the areaís river “highways” to all sides
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
2. Overview
of the conflict in the South Carolina Lowcountry.
 
Erected 2012 by Francis Marion Trail Commission of Francis Marion University.
 
Location. Marker is missing. It was located near 33° 50.543′ N, 79° 20.444′ W. Marker was in Britton's Neck, South Carolina, in Marion County. Marker was on Dunham's Bluff Road. Touch for map. Marker is at the end of the road at the river. Marker was in this post office area: Gresham SC 29546, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Snowís Island: Den of the Swamp Fox (here, next to this marker); Marion's Camp at Snow's Island (approx. 1.7 miles away); Britton's Neck/Britton's Ferry (approx. 1.7 miles away); Ebenezer United Methodist Church (approx. 6 miles away); Witherspoonís Ferry: Francis Marion Takes Command (approx. 6.2 miles away); Witherspoonís Ferry / Johnsonville (approx. 6.2 miles away); Marion at Portís Ferry / Asbury at Portís Ferry (approx. 6.2 miles away); Pleasant Hill School (approx. 11.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Britton's Neck.
 
Additional comments.
1. Gone
As of Feb 19, 2014, this and the Snow Island marker were both gone. A local gentleman at the site said
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
3. Overview
that they had been stolen. Too bad.
    — Submitted February 24, 2014, by Bill Welsch of Glen Allen, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Picture on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
4. Picture on the marker
The militiamen stationed as the Dunhamís Bluff redoubt cooked, ate, and slept in a large campsite located a short distance from here. Courtesy William D. Washington.
Photograph on marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
5. Photograph on marker
A brass candlestick unearthed during 2007 excavations at the Dunhamís Bluff campsite.
Map on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
6. Map on the marker
This map of Williamsburg District, from MillsĎ Atlas of the State of South Carolina(1825), notes Dunhamís Bluff as the location of “Marionís Camp.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 25, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 924 times since then and 107 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 25, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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