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Greensboro in Guilford County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Army of Tennessee

 
 
The Army of Tennessee Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
1. The Army of Tennessee Marker
Inscription.
They are all gone now with their
tattered flags and their faded uniforms.

Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, Averasboro, Bentonville and finally to Greensborough.

[ Right of Monument: ]
On April 26, 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered the Army of Tennessee at Durham Station, North Carolina. The Army centered in and around Guilford County, surrendered its arms and flags and began to disband. Beginning May 1, 1865, paroles were issued for several days from Greensborough and distributed to the Army of Tennessee. On May 2, 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston issued General Order No. 22, bidding farewell to those he would later call his “Matchless Soldiers”.


[ Left of Monument: ]
Johnstonís Farewell Order

General Orders No. 22
† † † † Comrades: † In terminating our official relations, I earnestly exhort you to observe faithfully the terms of pacification agreed upon: and to discharge the obligations of good and peaceful citizens, as well as you have performed the duties of thorough soldiers in the field. By such a course, you will best secure the comfort of your families and kindred, and restore
The Army of Tennessee Marker (Right) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
2. The Army of Tennessee Marker (Right)
tranquility to our country. You will return to your homes with the admiration of our people, won by the courage and noble devotion you have displayed in this long war. I shall always remember with pride the loyal support and generous confidence you have given me. I now part with you with deep regret – and bid you farewell with feelings of cordial friendship, and with earnest wishes that you may have hereafter all the prosperity and happiness to be found in the world.

[ Back of Monument: ]
Near this spot on April 13, 1865, President Jefferson Davis, members of the Confederate cabinet, and Generals Joseph E. Johnston and P. G. T. Beauregard met to discuss the Confederate military situation as a result of General Robert E. Leeís surrender at Appomattox. With the reluctant consent of President Davis, a letter was sent to General William T. Sherman requesting a cease-fire to allow civil authorities to negotiate a peace. As a result of this initiative, on April 26, 1865, Johnston surrendered the Army of Tennessee, which led to the end of the war.

Erected May 10, 1985
by
The Col. John Sloan Camp 1290
Sons of Confederate Veterans
C. Michael Briggs, Commander

 
Erected 1985 by of Confederate Veterans - Col. John Sloan Camp 1290.
 
Marker series.
The Army of Tennessee Marker (Left) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
3. The Army of Tennessee Marker (Left)
This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 36° 4.051′ N, 79° 47.402′ W. Marker is in Greensboro, North Carolina, in Guilford County. Marker is on S Davie Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Greensboro NC 27401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Men of Greensboro and Guilford County (here, next to this marker); Confederate Cabinet (here, next to this marker); Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolina Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Arms Factory (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jefferson Davis (about 300 feet away); General Nathanael Greene (about 700 feet away); Original Methodist Church / Former Methodist Cemetery (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greensboro.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Army of Tennessee Marker (Back) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
4. The Army of Tennessee Marker (Back)
Left of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
5. Left of Monument
Right of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
6. Right of Monument
Back of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
7. Back of Monument
Marker in Greensboro image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
8. Marker in Greensboro
The Army of Tennessee and other markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
9. The Army of Tennessee and other markers
Several markers and monuments are found at this location. The Army of Tennessee marker is seen here on the right.
Markers on S Davie Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
10. Markers on S Davie Street
The Army of Tennessee Marker (Right) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
11. The Army of Tennessee Marker (Right)
The Army of Tennessee Marker and surrounding markers image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
12. The Army of Tennessee Marker and surrounding markers
The Army of Tennessee Marker and surrounding markers image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, March 31, 2012
13. The Army of Tennessee Marker and surrounding markers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,093 times since then and 73 times this year. Last updated on April 2, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 2, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on August 8, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   11, 12, 13. submitted on April 2, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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