Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lamy in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Galisteo Basin / Southern Rockies

 
 
Galisteo Basin Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
1. Galisteo Basin Face of Marker
Inscription. Galisteo Basin. The extensive lowland south of here is called Galisteo basin, a sag in the earth’s crust where rock layers are depressed and thickened. It is one of the northernmost basins in the Basin and Range province in New Mexico and is bordered by the Rocky Mountains immediately to the north. Elevation 6,400 feet.

Southern Rockies. These foothills and the higher glaciated peaks to the north are the southern tip of the Rocky Mountains. This particular segment is known as the Sangre de Cristo (“blood of Christ”), a formidable barrier that rises above 13,000 feet in a chain of peaks that trend from Santa Fe on the south to Salida, Colorado, on the north.
 
Location. 35° 28.23′ N, 105° 54.255′ W. Marker is near Lamy, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 285 and Old Lamy Trail (County Road 33), on the right when traveling south on U.S. 285. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lamy NM 87540, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Galisteo Pueblo (approx. 5.7 miles away); Cañoncito at Apache Canyon (approx. 6.9 miles away); Seton Village
Southern Rockies Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
2. Southern Rockies Face of Marker
(approx. 9.4 miles away); Glorieta Pass Battlefield (approx. 10.9 miles away); Glorieta Battlefield (approx. 10.9 miles away); Colorado Volunteers at the Battles of Glorieta Pass (approx. 11.2 miles away); Santa Fe (approx. 13.8 miles away); Santa Fe Korean War Memorial (approx. 14.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Galisteo Basin Preserve. “For approximately 100 years, beginning around 1400, the Southern Tewa were challenged by Diné-speaking peoples—warriors from Apache and Navajo tribes that raided and deeply stressed the Tewas’ resources and sense of security. In the mid to late 1500s, Spanish explorers (or conquistadors) from Mexico journeyed north to New Mexico in search of gold and other treasure. In their wake, the Spanish brought deadly disease and new hardship on the struggling southern Tewa peoples. By 1600, the Spanish were in the Galisteo Basin to stay—introducing longhorn cattle and unknown crops like watermelon, wheat, chiles, and melons to the region. The Spanish also began mining silver in the Cerrillos Hills around 1581.” (Submitted on May 12, 2012.) 

2. Lamy Railroad & History Museum. “The town of Lamy is located
Galisteo Basin and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
3. Galisteo Basin and Marker
18 miles south of Santa Fe, New Mexico off US Hwy 285. Lamy is a railroad town created in 1879 when the Atchison,Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad laid its main track through New Mexico. The AT&SF bypassed the city of Santa Fe because the climb was too much for the engines of the day, so a spur line was built to the capital from Lamy. Lamy grew up where the spur line connects Santa Fe to the main track.” (Submitted on May 12, 2012.) 
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Foothills of the Southern Rockies and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
4. Foothills of the Southern Rockies and Marker
View of the Southern Rockies from Route 41 in the Galisteo Basin image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
5. View of the Southern Rockies from Route 41 in the Galisteo Basin
The telegraph wires on the horizon mark the tracks of the southernmost transcontinental railroad laid by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, now the BNSF Railway.
Lamy Station Waiting Room image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
6. Lamy Station Waiting Room
Trackside is beyond the door. Signboard shows the Amtrak Southwest Chief. Train No. 3 to Los Angeles stops at 1:17 in the afternoon followed by No. 4 to Kansas City and Chicago at 2:24.
AT&SF Railway's Lamy Station, Now an Amtrak Stop image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
7. AT&SF Railway's Lamy Station, Now an Amtrak Stop
Passengers to Santa Fe changed trains here. Today they change to a bus, the Lamy Shuttle, for the 30 minute ride to Santa Fe.
The Legal Tender Saloon & Restaurant in Lamy, New Mexico image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis A. Prats, April 12, 2012
8. The Legal Tender Saloon & Restaurant in Lamy, New Mexico
Directly across the road from the railroad station, it is now the Lamy Railroad & History Museum. It reverts to its former glory for dinner Fridays and Saturdays only. Other than this restaurant, there are no other businesses in Lamy. You can visit the museum when it is open as a restaurant at no additional charge, and it is the turnaround destination of the tourist train from Santa Fe operated by the Santa Fe Southern Railroad.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 12, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 592 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on May 12, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement