Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stronghold in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sugar Loaf Mountain

 
 
Sugar Loaf Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
1. Sugar Loaf Mountain Marker
Inscription. Has been designated a registered natural landmark under the provisions of the historic sites act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in illustrating the natural history of the United States.
 
Erected 1969 by U.S. Department of the Interior / National Park Service.
 
Location. 39° 15.094′ N, 77° 23.63′ W. Marker is in Stronghold, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Comus Road (Maryland Route 95) and Sugarloaf Mountain Road, on the right on Comus Road. Touch for map. On the left side of the entrance to Sugarloaf Mountain Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7901 Comus Road, Dickerson MD 20842, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sugarloaf Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Barnesville (approx. 2.2 miles away); a different marker also named Barnesville (approx. 2.2 miles away); Mt. Ephraim Crossroads (approx. 2.4 miles away); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 2.4 miles away); a different marker also named 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 2.5 miles away); Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 2.5 miles away); Chesapeake and Ohio Aqueduct (approx. 2.6 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
The Marker is on a Boulder at the Park Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
2. The Marker is on a Boulder at the Park Entrance
Sugarloaf 3,300 acres is all located in Frederick County Maryland. Marker indicate "Sugar Loaf" but the mountain name is "Sugarloaf". GPS coordinates indicate that the marker is located in Dickerson, MD, which is in Montgomery County.
 
Also see . . .  Sugarloaf Mountain Park. (Submitted on July 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. FDR and Sugarloaf
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt once had an eye to acquire the mountain as a presidential retreat, but was unable to secure an agreement. The Strong family was unwilling to part with the property.
    — Submitted July 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

2. Monadnock
Sugarloaf is an example of a monadnock, a geologic feature where a more resistant rock base is left behind as surrounding rock is eroded away. The mountain is mainly composed of quartzite, a harder rock than the sandstone frequently encountered in the area.
    — Submitted July 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

3. Monocacy Aqueduct
Quartzite quarried here at Sugarloaf was used to construct
Sugarloaf Mountain Seen from the East image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
3. Sugarloaf Mountain Seen from the East
the Monocacy Aqueduct on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal just south of the mountain.
    — Submitted July 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. LandmarksNatural Features
 
Rock Outcroppings at the Summit image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 28, 2007
4. Rock Outcroppings at the Summit
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,714 times since then and 63 times this year. Last updated on May 19, 2012, by Christie Kefauver of Dickerson, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement