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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Fe in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Captain Diego Arias de Quiros

 
 
Captain Diego Arias de Quiros Plaque image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
1. Captain Diego Arias de Quiros Plaque
Inscription. In 1697 this property was granted to Captain Diego Arias de Quiros by Spanish royal decree for his part in the reconquest of New Mexico with De Vargas. In 1879 bought by L. Bradford Prince, later Territorial Governor. In 1942 bought by Field estate for enlisted men’s club in World War II.
 
Location. 35° 41.247′ N, 105° 56.218′ W. Marker is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker is on East Palance Avenue just west of Cathedral Place, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 113 E Palace Ave, Santa Fe NM 87501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Building Stood Here Before 1680 (a few steps from this marker); Sena Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); Don Diego de Vargas Zapata Luján Ponce de León, El Marques de la Nava de Barcinas (within shouting distance of this marker); Hitching Post at the End of the Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Santa Fe’s First Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); Kateri Tekakwitha (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fray Angélico Chávez (about 300 feet away); Annexation of New Mexico (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Fe.
 
More about this marker.
Captain Diego Arias de Quiros Property and Plaque image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
2. Captain Diego Arias de Quiros Property and Plaque
Plaque is on the wall to the left of the door to the jewelry store. Access to other shops in the courtyard is through a breezeway out of frame on the right.
“De Vargas” on the plaque refers to Don Diego de Vargas (1643–1704) a Spanish governor of the New Spain territory of Santa Fe de Nuevo México, today the US states of New Mexico and Arizona. He is known for leading the reconquest of the territory in 1692 following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680.
 
Also see . . .  The Reconquista of New Mexico. by Vikki Gray and Angela Lewis.

“The second portion of the Reconquista was far from peaceful. In 1693, de Vargas returned to El Paso, and by October, was on his way back with seventy Spanish families, eighteen Franciscan friars, and a number of Tlaxlacan allies to begin the re-colonization of New Mexico. But by this time, the Pueblos had experienced second thoughts, and when the colonists arrived at Santa Fe in December, they found the city once again fortified.

“For two weeks, the Spanish colonists camped outside the city while de Vargas attempted to persuade the Indians to surrender. Finally, without a peaceful solution at hand, a decision was reached to take Santa Fe by force. Santa Fe was taken after a fierce battle that lasted two days. Afterwards, seventy Pueblo defenders were executed and several hundred captured men, women, and children sentenced to ten years servitude. The peaceful Reconquista was over. ” (Submitted on May 27, 2012.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Buildings
 
View from the Courtyard Towards the Street image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 13, 2012
3. View from the Courtyard Towards the Street
This view shows the entrance to the courtyard.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 27, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 423 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 27, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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