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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Birmingham in Jefferson County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

King's Spring

 
 
King's Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
1. King's Spring Marker
Inscription.
Avondale Park, dedicated in 1886, is one of Birmingham's earliest parks. The park site was chosen because of its natural spring, which was a popular attraction with the local people, as well as a favorite stopping point for weary travelers along the old Huntsville stagecoach road.

With its natural beauty, rolling topography, and natural spring, the park quickly became a gem for residents all over Birmingham and the region. The original spring, known as "King's Spring", emerged from a cave at the base of the hill, flowed through the park, and down the center of Spring Street, now 41st Street.

Over the years, the Spring has "seen" much; from children exploring along its banks, to baptisms, to Civil War battles. Union soldiers stopped to water their horses at the Spring, but were promptly chased away by Confederates who fired upon them. For a number of years, a small wading pool was located at the base of the hill, and children could be found wading and splashing as parents looked on.

During the 1970's, the entrance to the cave was closed and the spring was encased in pipe and hidden beneath a baseball field. As part of the 2011 renovation, the pipe was removed, allowing the spring to flow freely, once again.
 
Location. 33° 31.247′ N,
King's Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
2. King's Spring Marker
The spring is located to the right of the marker.
86° 46.228′ W. Marker is in Birmingham, Alabama, in Jefferson County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of 5th Avenue South and 41st Street South. Touch for map. Marker located in Avondale Park near the baseball fields. Marker is in this post office area: Birmingham AL 35222, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. "Lest We Forget" (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Forest Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of the First Alabama - Auburn Football Game (approx. 0.9 miles away); United States Pipe and Foundry Company (approx. one mile away); Independent Presbyterian Church (approx. one mile away); A.B. Loveman House (approx. 1.1 miles away); Sloss Furnaces (approx. 1.1 miles away); Duncan House (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Birmingham.
 
Also see . . .  Avondale Park by Bhamwiki. This website contains images of the park as well as a imaged of the mentioned wading pool by the cave. (Submitted on June 3, 2012, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.) 
 
Categories. Natural Resources
 
King's Spring emerging from under the rocks. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
3. King's Spring emerging from under the rocks.
Downstream view of the now opened channel. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
4. Downstream view of the now opened channel.
The cool waters of the spring flows into the pond located in the center of the park. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
5. The cool waters of the spring flows into the pond located in the center of the park.
Avondale Park's spring fed pond. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
6. Avondale Park's spring fed pond.
Entrance to Avondale Park. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
7. Entrance to Avondale Park.
Looking down 41st Street (Spring Street) from Avondale Park. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, May 29, 2012
8. Looking down 41st Street (Spring Street) from Avondale Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 3, 2012, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 585 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on June 3, 2012, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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