Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Blairsden-Graeagle in Plumas County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Emigrant Trail

 
 
Emigrant Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 31, 2012
1. Emigrant Trail Marker
This marker is not mounted on an arrastra stone, but a Chilean wheel.
Inscription.
1850
Marysville - Jamison City
Tablet set in stone from early day arrastra used in Jamison Creek.
 
Erected 1932 by Native Daughters of the Golden West, Plumas Pioneer Parlor No. 219; Native Sons of the Golden West, Quincy Parlor No. 13.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 39° 45.356′ N, 120° 41.936′ W. Marker is near Blairsden-Graeagle, California, in Plumas County. Marker is on Johnsville - McCrea Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. This marker is approximately 1/4 mile up the Johnsville - McCrea Road from the Eureka-Plumas State Park Museum toward the Jamison Creek Campground. Marker is in this post office area: Blairsden-Graeagle CA 96103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pioneer Ski Area of America (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tharís Gold in Them Hills! (about 500 feet away); Winter in the Sierra (about 500 feet away); Johnsville Firehouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); Longboard Ski Races
Emigrant Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 30, 2012
2. Emigrant Trail Marker
(approx. 0.7 miles away); Mohawk Hotel and Tavern (approx. 3.8 miles away but has been reported missing); Jamison City, Eureka Mine and Mill, Johnstown (approx. 4.1 miles away); a different marker also named Jamison City (approx. 4.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Blairsden-Graeagle.
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
Chili (Chilean) Wheels image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 30, 2012
3. Chili (Chilean) Wheels
Before the development of more sophisticated machinery, miners used wheels like these to crush gold-bearing quartz. The idea for Chili wheels was brought to the California gold fields by Chilean miners. These wheels were thought to originally be nine feet in diameter. They wore down rapidly with heavy use.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 16, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 339 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 16, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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