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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Atlantic Highlands in Monmouth County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Henry Hudson Springs

 
 
Henry Hudson Springs Historic Plaque image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
1. Henry Hudson Springs Historic Plaque
Inscription. In 1609, Henry Hudson drew water from this spring.
Before the White Man's arrival, Lenni Lenape Indians obtained water from this site. Packet ships continued to use the spring into the 1800's.
 
Erected 1977 by Atlantic Highlands Historical Society.
 
Location. 40° 24.75′ N, 74° 1.133′ W. Marker is in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey, in Monmouth County. Marker is on Bayside Drive near Prospect Road. Touch for map. Located in an extremely steep residential neighborhood and difficult to find. Take Prospect Road North off of Ocean Blvd. Head down the steep drive towards the Atlantic. The springs are identified by a small wooden sign atop a brick wall. The old stone steps that lead down are very slippery and it is easy for a visitor to fall and get injured. Not a monument for very young children to visit!. Marker is in this post office area: Atlantic Highlands NJ 07716, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Highest Point on the Atlantic Seaboard (approx. 0.8 miles away); Friends of Monmouth County 9/11 Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); Raritan Bay & New York Harbor (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Hartshorne Legacy
Stone Edifice at Spring Exit image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
2. Stone Edifice at Spring Exit
(approx. 0.8 miles away); Longshore Sediment Movement (approx. 0.8 miles away); British Campsite (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named British Campsite (approx. one mile away); Navesink (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlantic Highlands.
 
Additional comments.
1. 400th Aniversary
2009 marks the 400th aniversary of Henry Hudson entering New York Harbor.
    — Submitted February 25, 2008, by David Anderson of Middletown, New Jersey.

2. Why isnít the water still safe for human consumption?
Many years ago, around 1956, a friend and I use to ride our bikes from Highlands to the “Spring.” The water tasted great back then; we never got sick.
    — Submitted March 9, 2008, by Roger B. Hermans of Honesdale, Pennsylvania.

 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansNatural FeaturesNotable PersonsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Fresh Spring Water Drips from Pipes and Flows Down to the Atlantic image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
3. Fresh Spring Water Drips from Pipes and Flows Down to the Atlantic
There's a sign next to the springs posted by the city health department stating that the water isn't safe for human consumption. I wonder if they would have passed the water that flowed out of it during Hudson's time?
Wooden Sign on Top of Stonework that Identifies Springs from the Road image. Click for full size.
By R. C.
4. Wooden Sign on Top of Stonework that Identifies Springs from the Road
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,190 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 24, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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