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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Grand Central Terminal

“Landmark of New York”

 
 
Grand Central Terminal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2012
1. Grand Central Terminal Marker
Inscription. Completed in 1913 from plans of Warren & Wetmore and Reed & Stem on site of earlier depot built by Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1871. Statuary group over main entrance executed by Jules Coutan.
 
Erected 1957 by The New York Community Trust.
 
Location. 40° 45.134′ N, 73° 58.659′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of West 42nd Street and Park Avenue on West 42nd Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10017, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "The Kneeling Fireman" (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); 230 Park Avenue (approx. 0.2 miles away); New York Public Library (approx. 0.2 miles away); John Paul II House (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Fred F. French Building (approx. mile away); The Gabarron Foundation (approx. mile away); Mary Lindley Murray (approx. mile away); New York Daily News Building (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Regarding Grand Central Terminal. A terminal is located at the end of the railroad tracks, a station is an intermediate stop on a railroad.
 
Also see . . .
Grand Central Terminal at 42nd Street & Park Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
2. Grand Central Terminal at 42nd Street & Park Avenue
- note Commodore Vanderbilt's statue in front of the big window, above the elevated lanes of Park Avenue.

1. Grand Central Terminal - New York Architecture. Grand Central Terminal was built to house Cornelius Vanderbilt's railroad network, consolidated in the late 19th century as New York Central. (Submitted on July 7, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Grand Central Terminal - History. In 1903, a select group of architects were invited to submit designs for the new Grand Central Terminal in a competition. (Submitted on July 7, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

3. Grand Central Terminal Walking Tour. Start your tour at the four-sided clock (round Information Booth) on the Main Concourse. This gives you a perfect spot to see most everything on the Main Concourse. (Submitted on July 7, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
Grand Central Terminal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2012
3. Grand Central Terminal Marker
Statuary Group Executed by Jules Coutan image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2012
4. Statuary Group Executed by Jules Coutan
This statuary groups in locate over the main entrance.
Grand Central Terminal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2012
5. Grand Central Terminal Marker
Note pedestrian walking between two window panels.
Crystal Tree image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2012
6. Crystal Tree
This 'tree' is hung from the ceiling in the market at Grand Central Terminal.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 352 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 7, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   2. submitted on October 6, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 7, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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