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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

U.S. Artillery

 
 
U.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. U.S.A. Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
September 17-18, 1862.

During and after Sedgwick's assault on the Confederates in the West Woods, a line of batteries was established, running from Mumma's Cemetery on the south, crossing the road at this point and extending northwardly in front of the East Woods to the Poffenberger Lane beyond which, on the hill beyond J. Poffenbergers, the Reserve Artillery of the First Army Corps was established.

The line was held in turn by batteries of the First, Twelfth, Second and Sixth Army Corps and held in check several attempts of the Confederates to advance from the West Woods.

The batteries remained in position until the Confederates withdrew from the field.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 83.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.871′ N, 77° 44.636′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Cornfield Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located between stops three and four of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
U.S. Artillery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. U.S. Artillery Marker
At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery B (here, next to this marker); First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); Jackson's Command (a few steps from this marker); First New Jersey Brigade (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (a few steps from this marker); Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); Sixth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); 90th Pennslyvania (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
More about this marker. Also known as the "First, Twelfth, Second, and Sixth Corps Artillery Tablet" in some references.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Batlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Phase Four of the Battle of Antietam. This battle map details the locations of units at around 10 a.m., September 17, 1862. Note the assembly of artillery batteries in an arch from the Mumma's Farm north to the cornfield. (Submitted on February 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Four Cannon, Two Tablets, and the 1st New Jersey Brigade Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. Four Cannon, Two Tablets, and the 1st New Jersey Brigade Monument
Along this section of Cornfield Avenue, to the east of the four gun artillery display, are War Department Tablets 339 (left side of road) and 83 (right side of road. To the far right is the 1st New Jersey Brigade monument.
 

3. U.S. Artillery Tablet. Because of the lack of a formal title, most secondary sources reference this tablet as "U.S. Artillery." (Submitted on March 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
U.S. Artillery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. U.S. Artillery Marker
12pdr Light Field Gun Model 1857, "Napoleon" image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
5. 12pdr Light Field Gun Model 1857, "Napoleon"
Representing different batteries that occupied the line here is a set of four "Napoleons." Three of which were made by Revere Cooper, of Boston, Massachusetts (Registry numbers 47, 53, and 79). The fourth was cast by Cyrus Alger and Company, also of Boston, registry number 26.
Napoleon Muzzle Markings image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
6. Napoleon Muzzle Markings
Muzzle markings were used to denote the origin, registry (serial number), inspector, and other attributes of a cannon. By 1861 the Army's Ordnance Department standardized these in a format seen above. "No 53" is the registry number identifying this individual piece. "Revere Cooper Co." is the manufacturer. "1213 lbs" is the weight of the cannon when produced. "1862" is the year of manufacture. "T.J.R." are the initials of Thomas J. Rodman, who inspected the weapon and accepted it for service.
Rimbase Number image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
7. Rimbase Number
Often obscured or overlooked, the manufacturer placed their own sequence number or foundry number on the trunnion rimbase. Here, since the upper retaining strap has been removed, is visible "932."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 748 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7. submitted on February 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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