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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps

 
 
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps,

Brig. Gen. Geo. S. Greene, Commanding,
(September 17, 1862.)

Tyndale's and Stainrook's Brigades of Greene's Division formed line about 8 a.m., a short distance beyond the East Woods and, advancing to their eastern edge, struck the right of the Confederate line at and north of this point, turned it after a short and sharp contest and compelled the Confederate forces north of the Smoketown Road and east of the Hagerstown Pike to withdraw to the West Woods and the fields south of the Smoketown Road. Moving obliquely to the left the two brigades - Tyndale on the right and Stainrook on the left - crossed the Smoketown Road and followed in pursuit to the ridge on Mumma's Farm east of the Dunkard Church.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 117.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.881′ N, 77° 44.514′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Cornfield Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located at the pull off for stop three of the driving tour of Antietam
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker
Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The East Woods (a few steps from this marker); Jackson's Command (a few steps from this marker); Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); 13th New Jersey Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Sixth Army Corps (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Longstreet's Command (about 400 feet away); First New Jersey Brigade (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (about 600 feet away); U.S. Artillery (about 600 feet away); Battery B (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Regarding Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps. This marker is included on the East Woods Virtual Tour by Markers see the Virtual tour link below to see the markers in sequence.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Greene's Division markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Batlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
East End of Cornfield Avenue - Driving Tour Stop Three image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. East End of Cornfield Avenue - Driving Tour Stop Three
At the east end of Cornfield Avenue is a pull off for stop three. Around stop three stand War Department tablet #117 (Greene's Division) and a National Park Service interpretive marker, on the left or north side of the road. On the right, or south side, side of the road is War Department tablet #340 for Garland's Brigade.

Tyndall's Brigade of Green's division advanced across this ground, what was then part of the East Woods.
 

2. 2nd Division, XII Corps. The arrival Greene's three brigade division broke the Confederate line in this sector, and caused a shift of the fighting to the West Woods and Dunker Church area. (Submitted on February 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. East Woods Virtual Tour by Markers. A collection of markers interpreting the action of during the Battle of Antietam around the East Woods. (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. George S. Greene. George Sears Greene (May 6, 1801 – January 28, 1899) was a civil engineer and a Union general during the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps Marker
Brig. General George S. Greene (1801-1899) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
5. Brig. General George S. Greene (1801-1899)
Greene led a crushing attack against the Confederates near the Dunker Church, achieving the farthest penetration of Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson's lines than any Union unit. Under immense pressure, Greene held his small division in advance of the rest of the army for four hours, but eventually withdrew after suffering heavy losses
Advance of Greene's Division image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Advance of Greene's Division
Looking southwest from stop three. The Smoketown Road runs through the trees on the far left. The New York State monument can be seen in the distance through those trees. Following the line of telephone poles down the Smoketown Road is the area of the Dunker Church. Two of Greene's brigades broke through the East Woods here. Tyndall's advanced from what is today the Cornfield Avenue (did not exist at the time of the battle). Stainrook's was on his left, centered on the Smoketown Road. Both brigades advanced to the high ground near where the New York Monument stands today.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 723 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on February 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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