Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Omaha in Douglas County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford

 
 
Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
1. Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford Marker
Inscription.

38th President
of the United States

“My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over. Our Constitution works. Our Great Republic is a government of laws and not of men.
Here, the People rule…”
President Ford’s Inaugural Address
August 9, 1974

President Gerald R. Ford
visited this site during construction May 7, 1976
and personally
dedicated it to the People of Omaha Sept. 21, 1977

[Roll of U.S. Presidents]

 
Location. 41° 14.742′ N, 95° 57.612′ W. Marker is in Omaha, Nebraska, in Douglas County. Marker is at the intersection of Wooworth Avenue and 32nd Street, on the right when traveling west on Wooworth Avenue. Touch for map. Monument is on the grounds of the Gerald Ford Birthsite and Gardens. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3202 Wooworth Avenue, Omaha NE 68105, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Territory and State of Nebraska (within shouting distance of this marker); The City of Omaha, Nebraska (within shouting distance of this marker); President Gerald R. Ford (within shouting distance of this marker);
Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford and Presidents Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
2. Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford and Presidents Markers
First Lady Betty Ford (within shouting distance of this marker); Hanscom Park Flower Garden (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hanscom Park Lagoon (approx. 0.3 miles away); Congregation of Israel - 1884 (approx. one mile away); On The Wings of Angels 9/11 Memorial (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Omaha.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ford Birthsite and Gardens. (Submitted on August 5, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum. (Submitted on August 5, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. President Gerald R. Ford. (Submitted on August 5, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
U.S. Presidents Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
3. U.S. Presidents Marker
U.S. Presidents Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
4. U.S. Presidents Marker
U.S. Presidents Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
5. U.S. Presidents Marker
U.S. Presidents Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
6. U.S. Presidents Marker
Gerald R. Ford Medallion on Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
7. Gerald R. Ford Medallion on Marker
President Gerald R. Ford Birthsite & Garden Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 16, 2012
8. President Gerald R. Ford Birthsite & Garden Sign
Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., Birthsite
9. Birthsite of Gerald R. Ford
Gerald R. Ford image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
10. Gerald R. Ford
This 1987 portrait of Gerald R. Ford by Everett Raymond Kinstler hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Gerald Ford was perfectly happy being a Michigan congressman and House minority leader. But Ford's congressional career abruptly ended in 1973, when President Richard Nixon appointed him to succeed Vice President Spiro Agnew, who had resigned amid revelations of misconduct. Within a year, Ford's political fortunes took yet another sharp turn. On August 9, 1974, with Nixon himself forced to resign from office, Ford became the only unelected vice president to succeed to the White House. Ford's pardoning of Nixon shortly thereafter drew angry criticism. Nevertheless, his conciliatory leadership succeeded in restoring a much-eroded confidence in the presidency. Summarizing the orderly way he came to office despite the unsettling events that put him there, he said at his swearing-in, ‘Our Constitution works.’ In large measure, it was Ford who ensured that it did.

Everett Raymond Kinstler's likeness was painted at Ford's request specifically for the National Portrait Gallery. Kinstler based the portrait on sketches that he had made in the late 1970s, when he was working on Ford's official White House likeness.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 392 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on August 5, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   10. submitted on August 25, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
Paid Advertisement