Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rochester in Monroe County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Susan B. Anthony House

Headquarters of the Suffrage Movement

 
 
Susan B. Anthony House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
1. Susan B. Anthony House Marker
Saved as a large image. Click picture to view.
Inscription. A Suffragist and much more
Susan B. Anthony lived in this house for the forty most active years of her life. This house was the site of her famous arrest for voting in 1872 and her death in 1906. It served as the headquarters for the National Woman Suffrage Association and the Rochester Political Equality Club.

Suffragist
Anthony founded the National Woman Suffrage Association and campaigned to amend the U.S. Constitution to secure women's right to vote.

Abolitionist
Anthony spoke, organized, petitioned, and faced physical danger in the campaign to end slavery in the United States, often joining her lifelong friend, Frederick Douglass.

Education Reformer
Anthony called for equal educational opportunities for all and pressed schools, colleges, and universities to open their doors to women and former slaves.

Labor Activist
Anthony published The Revolution, a women's rights newspaper that promoted unions for women workers and equal pay for equal work.

Arrested for Voting!
Come into the front parlor where I was arrested by a U.S. Marshal for voting in the 1872 presidential election. I voted because I believed women had that right under the 14th amendment.

Susan B. Anthony Timeline
2004 The first major exterior and interior renovation of the house begins.
1998
Susan B. Anthony House Marker as seen facing north on Madison image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
2. Susan B. Anthony House Marker as seen facing north on Madison
#19 Madison opens as Visitors Venter, Carriage House is built.
1977 Susan B. Anthony Preservation District created on the National Register of Historic Places.
1966 House designated a National Landmark.
1945 House purchased by a group of Rochester women and incorporated as the Susan B. Anthony Memorial.
1920 Fourteen years after Anthony's death, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution finally grants women the right to vote.
1906 Anthony dies at her Madison Street home on March 13, at age 86.
1895 Anthony creates a full third floor on her home to serve as a workroom for writing the history of the suffrage movement and her biography.
1972 Anthony is arrested in this house for voting; in 1873 she stands trial in Canandaigua, is found guilty and refuses to pay fine.
1866 Anthony moves to Madison Street with her mother and sister, Mary.
1845 Anthony family moves by packet boat on the Erie Canal to a farm near Rochester
1820 Susan B. Anthony is born in Adams, Massachusetts
 
Erected by Seaway Trail Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Great Lakes Seaway Trail National Scenic Byway, and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 43° 9.193′ N, 77° 37.672′ W. Marker is in Rochester, New York
Susan B. Anthony House Marker as seen facing south on Madison image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
3. Susan B. Anthony House Marker as seen facing south on Madison
If you come visit the house, understand that while the area surrounding Madison is "rough," due to the House, Susan B. Anthony park (with the Let's Have Tea sculpture) and the Frederick Douglass Resource Center (on King Street) Madison is quite safe to park and visit.
, in Monroe County. Marker is on Madison Street 0.2 miles north of West Main Street (New York State Route 33). Touch for map. The marker illustrated here is a recent installation. There used to be one of New York's blue and yellow signs out front, but for whatever reason they told me theirs is in the basement. When I stopped by to take the pictures, the women workers were outside and we got to talking. Along with the New York Education Department marker in the basement, there's another item that was donated to them - a dedicatory plaque from the city parks department. The donation came with no indication of its provenance. The House has no idea where it came from originally, and a stop at the Library's local history research center turned up nothing. If/when the mystery is solved, I'll update this page, until then, pictures of the second marker (located behind the house) are also below. Marker is at or near this postal address: 17-19 Madison Street, Rochester NY 14608, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Transformation of a Neighborhood (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Rochester City Hospital (about 400 feet away); D. Matthew Brown, Jr. (about 800 feet away); Susan B. Anthony Voted Here (approx. 0.2 miles away); Crossroads of Transportation
Susan B. Anthony House (1967) image. Click for full size.
By J. Carl Burke, Jr., August 9, 1967
4. Susan B. Anthony House (1967)
This image, courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey, shows the Susan B. Anthony House as it appeared in 1967, with the New York State Dept. of Education historical marker plainly visible.
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Morrie E. Silver (approx. half a mile away); St. Mary's Hospital (approx. half a mile away); Ely House - 1837 (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rochester.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located between 17 & 19 Madison. 17 is the actual Susan B. Anthony House (which was actually owned by her sister Mary, as Susan was not home enough at her busiest to keep up with the demands of home ownership). 19 Madison is the Visitors Center and gift shop, as well as a nicely curated, but small, museum space.
 
Regarding Susan B. Anthony House. The Susan B. Anthony House was recently officially designated a Museum, so the new official name is the Susan B. Anthony House and Museum. The women who work here as docents and guides are very friendly and welcoming to visitors. The home is still undergoing renovations, but they are doing it a room at a time so that the house can still be toured.

The location of the 1872 polling place is nearby and marked with a brass replica ballot box. Marker and monument shown and described on this marker:
http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=56013
Susan B. Anthony (1900) image. Click for full size.
By Frances B. Johnston, 1900
5. Susan B. Anthony (1900)
This image, courtesy of the Frances Benjamin Johnston Collection in the Library of Congress, depicts Susan B. Anthony at the entrance to her home in 1900 (note the "17" on the post on the right - her address being 17 Madison Street).

 
Also see . . .
1. Susan B. Anthony Museum and House website. (Submitted on August 11, 2012, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
2. Susan B. Anthony House - Wikipedia. Designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark on June 23, 1965. (Submitted on December 8, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRCharity & Public WorkCivil RightsEducationPolitics
 
Susan B. Anthony House image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
6. Susan B. Anthony House
Susan B. Anthony House Visitors Center image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
7. Susan B. Anthony House Visitors Center
Susan B. Anthony House and Visitors Center image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
8. Susan B. Anthony House and Visitors Center
Susan B. Anthony House Dedicatory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
9. Susan B. Anthony House Dedicatory Marker
Located behind the house, as described above.
Susan B. Anthony House Dedicatory Marker setting image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 7, 2012
10. Susan B. Anthony House Dedicatory Marker setting
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 9, 2012, by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. This page has been viewed 624 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 9, 2012, by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York.   4, 5. submitted on August 11, 2012.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on August 9, 2012, by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement