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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oak Island in Brunswick County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Caswell

 
 
Fort Caswell Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 15, 2008
1. Fort Caswell Marker
Inscription. Seized by N.C. Militia three months before firing on Fort Sumter. Governor Ellis ordered its return to Federal Authority; three miles east.
 
Erected 1969 by Archives and Highway Departments. (Marker Number D-62.)
 
Location. 33° 54.517′ N, 78° 4.417′ W. Marker is in Oak Island, North Carolina, in Brunswick County. Marker is at the intersection of Country Club Road (State Highway 133) and Yaupon Drive, on the right when traveling south on Country Club Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oak Island NC 28465, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hurricane Hazel (approx. 0.2 miles away); Robert C. Ruark (approx. 3.1 miles away); Indian Trail Tree (approx. 3.1 miles away); Robert Ruark (approx. 3.2 miles away); Catalino Tingzon (approx. 3.2 miles away); Southport’s First Fire Alarm (approx. 3.2 miles away); Franklin Square (approx. 3.2 miles away); Mrs. Jessie Stevens Taylor (approx. 3.3 miles away).
 
Regarding Fort Caswell. Fort Caswell is now on the grounds of the North Carolina Baptist Assembly and is used for youth summer camp and youth and adult retreats. When there
Fort Caswell Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 15, 2008
2. Fort Caswell Marker
If you look closely on to the left of this marker you can see the Hurricane Hazel marker across the street two blocks away.
are no large events in progress visitors can drive through the grounds, park, and climb around the fort and other structures. A day pass, good until 5 PM is $3 per person. To reach the fort, continue south on Country Club Road, which will turn east and become Caswell Beach Road. The Assembly grounds begin at the end of the road, at a gatehouse.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Fort Caswell Entrance image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 17, 2009
3. Fort Caswell Entrance
The following is stencilled on the lintel: “Fort Caswell. Built 1826–1836, cost $173,102. Named for Richard Caswell, first governor of North Carolina.”
A Corner of Five-Sided Fort Caswell image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 17, 2009
4. A Corner of Five-Sided Fort Caswell
Inside Fort Caswell image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 17, 2009
5. Inside Fort Caswell
One of the five walls is missing; destroyed when the powder magazine was blown up by the garrison in 1865 when they were abandoning the fort.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 29, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,466 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 29, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on February 21, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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