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Penn Quarter in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Marshall

 

—John Marshall Park —

 
John Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2008
1. John Marshall Marker
Inscription.
Site of the residence of
John Marshall
Chief Justice of the United States
Plaque erected under the auspices of the
Columbia Historical Society
and
the Bar Association
of the District of Columbia.


[Inscription on wall below the marker plaque:]
John Marshall
Born Germantown, Virginia - September 24, 1755
Culpeper Minutemen, Lieutenant - 1775
Continental Army, Colonel - 1776-1781
Studied at William and Mary - 1780
First elected to Virginia House of Delegates and begins practice of law - 1782
Delegate, Virginia Convention for Ratification of the United States Constitution - 1788
Envoy to France during the XYZ Affair - 1797-1798
Elected Virginia Representative to Congress - 1799
Secretary of State under President John Adams - 1800
Third Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court - 1801-1835
Died, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - July 6, 1835
 
Erected 1983 by Columbia Historical Society and the Bar Association of the District of Columbia.
 
Location. 38° 53.535′ N, 77° 1.033′ W. Marker is in Penn Quarter, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Pennsylvania
John Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2008
2. John Marshall Marker
The marker plaque is visible in the top of the wall to the left, above the insriptions on its face.
Avenue, NW and 4th Street, NW on Pennsylvania Avenue, NW. Touch for map. The marker plaque is on a low retaining wall in John Marshall Park. It is accessible for pedestrians at the east side of the park's south (Pennsylvania Avenue) entrance. The Marshall statue is in the north center of the park, toward the entrance from C Street, NW. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chief Justice John Marshall (within shouting distance of this marker); Major General George G. Meade Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Embassy of Canada, Washington, DC (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Washington City Spring (about 400 feet away); Pennsylvania Avenue (about 600 feet away); Andrew W. Mellon (about 700 feet away); National Grange (about 700 feet away); Protecting Consumers and Competition (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Penn Quarter.
 
More about this marker. The statue by William Wetmore Story was cast in Rome in 1883. It was relocated from the west side of the Capitol with construction of John Marshall Park at the residence site and dedicated by the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation in 1983.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Marshall
John Marshall Statue image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2008
3. John Marshall Statue
Inscription:
John Marshall: Chief Justice of the United States, 1801-1835

Sculptor, William Wetmore Story
. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. The John Marshall Statue. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. John Marshall: Defender of a Nation. ... Far from championing unbridled judicial activism, Marshall was always mindful of the restraints on judicial power. Hobson points out that Marshall sought to distinguish legal questions from political issues. For example, Marshall repeatedly deferred to the political branches of government in matters pertaining to foreign affairs. Likewise he was cautious in handling politically sensitive slavery cases. Notwithstanding his growing personal distaste for slavery, Marshall was reluctant to second-guess legislative determinations that slavery was lawful. In short, moderation was a key component of Marshall’s judicial philosophy. ... (Submitted on January 1, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

4. John Marshall Memorial Park. ...John Marshall Memorial Park will have the unique responsibility to educate and inspire all who visit about the importance of the Judicial Branch, the scope of the U.S. Constitution, and the life and times of the founding fathers who envisioned the government as we know it today. ... (Submitted on January 1, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

5. William Wetmore Story.
Chess players in John Marshall Park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2008
4. Chess players in John Marshall Park
sculpture by Lloyd Lillie, in front of the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse.
(Submitted on August 20, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Marbury v. Madison; William Wetmore Story, sculptor; Elijah Barrett Prettyman.
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Revolutionary
 
David Phillips' Lilly Pond (one of two, 1982), northeast corner of the park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2012
5. David Phillips' Lilly Pond (one of two, 1982), northeast corner of the park
The birds and lilies are real, the frogs and fish are stone.
Chief Justice John Marshall in his park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2012
6. Chief Justice John Marshall in his park
The John Marshall Park, image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 4, 2008
7. The John Marshall Park,
view to the west with the Canadian Embassy behind the trees.
John Marshall image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
8. John Marshall
- the original of three castings of the statue by William Wetmore Story, presently on display in the Supreme Court of the United States Building on Capitol Hill.
"Marshall " memorials image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
9. "Marshall " memorials
Chief Justice John Marshall's statue at left, and Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall's portrait by Simmie L. Knox on the wall at right - near the U.S. Supreme Court Building visitor's information desk.
John Marshall Park: image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 19, 2012
10. John Marshall Park:
"Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, 1983."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 11, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,801 times since then and 46 times this year. Last updated on August 22, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 5, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on August 20, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7. submitted on August 5, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   8, 9. submitted on January 1, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   10. submitted on August 21, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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