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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

General Lee’s Beloved Traveller

 
 
General Lee’s Beloved Traveller Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 21, 2012
1. General Lee’s Beloved Traveller Marker
Inscription.
In Memory of
General Lee’s Beloved Traveller
Rarely has an animal captured so much affection.

Traveller, first called Jeff Davis and later Greenbrier, was born in 1857 near Blue Sulphur Springs (now in West Virginia). In 1862, Lee purchased him and renamed him after one of George Washington’s horses. This sturdy American saddlebred, sixteen hands high, iron gray with black mane and tail, carried Lee through many of the Civil War’s major campaigns, and later on pleasant late afternoon rides into the hillsides around Lexington.

Not long after Lee’s death, Traveller stepped on a nail and developed tetanus. He died in the summer of 1871 and was buried in a ravine behind the college. A century later, his skeleton was reburied here. The Virginia Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy, marked the grave and his stable.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 37° 47.239′ N, 79° 26.514′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Letcher Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located next to Lee Chapel on the grounds of Washington and Lee University. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington VA 24450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
General Lee’s Beloved Traveller Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 21, 2012
2. General Lee’s Beloved Traveller Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Traveller’s Grave (here, next to this marker); William Graham (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington and Lee University (within shouting distance of this marker); Cyrus Hall McCormick (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Washington and Lee University (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Robinson (about 300 feet away); Morris House (about 300 feet away); Lee-Jackson House (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
More about this marker. An 1866 photograph of Robert E. Lee on Traveller, by Michael Miley, appears on the left of the marker. It has a caption of “During Lee’s presidency of Washington College, Traveller grazed on the campus front lawn and shared a stable with Lucy Long and Ajax, Lee’s other horses. The doors of the stable, now a garage, remain open to allow Traveller’s spirit to roam freely.”
On the right side of the marker is a photograph of Traveller’s Skeleton. Below this is the caption “Not long after his original burial, Traveller was disinterred and his bones sent to New York for preparation for display. In 1907, the mounted skeleton was finally placed in the university’s Brooks Museum of Natural History. From 1929 until the renovation
Marker at Wash. & Lee University image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 21, 2012
3. Marker at Wash. & Lee University
The marker is located on the campus of Washington and Lee University. Lee Chapel can be seen in the background.
of the Lee Chapel in the early 1960s, it was displayed in the chapel museum.”
Both of these photos are from the Leyburn Library Special Collections.
 
Categories. Animals
 
Traveller's Grave image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 21, 2012
4. Traveller's Grave
Traveller is buried next to the marker, a few feet from the grave of Gen. Lee.
Lee Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 21, 2012
5. Lee Chapel
The marker is located just outside of Lee Chapel. Lee's office is in this building and the Lee family are buried here.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 507 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 23, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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