Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Johnstown in Fulton County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Women's Rights

 
 
Women's Rights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2012
1. Women's Rights Marker
Inscription.

Birthplace of Elizabeth
Cady Stanton, 1815 - 1902
Pioneer of Women's Rights
A Leader in the Women's
Suffrage Movement.
George E. Pataki, Governor

 
Erected by New York State.
 
Location. 43° 0.4′ N, 74° 22.359′ W. Marker is in Johnstown, New York, in Fulton County. Marker is on North Market Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Johnstown NY 12095, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Elizabeth Cady Stanton (a few steps from this marker); Historic Johnstown (within shouting distance of this marker); Grave of Sir William Johnson (within shouting distance of this marker); Lest We Forget (within shouting distance of this marker); Founder of Johnstown (within shouting distance of this marker); Superintendent of Indian Affairs (within shouting distance of this marker); A Military Commander (within shouting distance of this marker); A Colonial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Johnstown.
 
Regarding Women's Rights.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton


Fulton
Women's Rights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2012
2. Women's Rights Marker
The marker is mounted on a post which is behind the car.
County's most famous daughter recognized as a child the injustices women in her society had to endure. In Elizabeth's autobiography, she refers to her childhood experiences that "changed considerably the current of my life." She learned about laws that were unfavorable to women in her father's law office, and wanted to cut them out of the law books. It was her father, Judge Daniel Cady, who told her she would have to prepare a speech and go to Albany to talk to legislators if she wanted to make a change. She would do this in 1854 to advocate for women's rights In 1884 she would return to Johnstown with Susan B. Anthony to work on the third volume of the History of Woman Suffrage. During this time, she and Susan cast votes in the local school board election. It was here in Johnstown that Elizabeth was born, and inspired to work for women's rights, and became a mother herself.
 
Additional keywords. Women's Rights Womens' Rights
 
Categories. Civil RightsPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 260 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 3, 2012, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement