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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fulton in Callaway County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Berlin Wall

 
 
The Berlin Wall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, June 13, 2012
1. The Berlin Wall Marker
Inscription. Following the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945, the country was divided into four zones of occupation by the World War II Allies. The United States, Great Britain, France and the Soviet Union. Berlin, located deep within the Soviet zone also was subjected to four-power control. Three years later, the Soviets tried to force the Western presence out of the city by severing highway, rail and water links between West Berlin and the rest of Germany. After an eleven-month Airlift organized by the United States, the Soviets lifted the blockade.

In 1949, the Western powers established West Germany by uniting their three occupation zones. Moscow responded by creating East Germany. As time passed, West Berlin, an island of Western prosperity within the Soviet bloc, became an even greater irritation to the Soviets. By 1961, three million East Germans had fled to the West.

In the early morning of August 13, 1961, 28 miles of barbed wire coils were stretched along the border between East and West Berlin, in an attempt to end the flow of refugees. Once the Soviets were certain the West would not destroy the temporary barricade, work began on a permanent concrete barrier. This wall became the physical manifestation of the "Iron Curtain", referred to by Winston Churchill in his 1946 "Sinews of Peace" address at Westminster College.

Twenty-eight

Sections of the Berlin Wall image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, June 13, 2012
2. Sections of the Berlin Wall
years later, Moscow relaxed its grip on its satellite regimes because of internal crises in the Soviet Union, and permitted those governments to make decisions free from Kremlin domination. On November 7, after massive public demonstrations, the East German cabinet resigned; on the 8th, the Communist Party Politburo and Central Committee resigned; and on November 9, 1989, an official of the East German government announced that the Wall would come down at the stroke of midnight.

The "Iron Curtain" was no more, and the re-unification of the divided Germany ensued.
 
Location. 38° 50.991′ N, 91° 57.3′ W. Marker is in Fulton, Missouri, in Callaway County. Marker is on West 7th Street just west of Westminster Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fulton MO 65251, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The National Winston Churchill Museum (within shouting distance of this marker); The Winston Churchill Memorial and Library (within shouting distance of this marker); Robertson Historic District (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); President Robert L. D. Davidson (about 500 feet away); William Chrisman Swope Memorial Chapel

Sections of the Berlin Wall image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, June 13, 2012
3. Sections of the Berlin Wall
(about 600 feet away); Winston Churchill's "Iron Curtain" Speech (about 700 feet away); Westminster Hall Threshold (about 800 feet away); War Comes to Westminster College (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fulton.
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, Cold
 
"Breakthrough" image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, June 13, 2012
4. "Breakthrough"
by Edwina Sandys, made from eight Berlin Wall sections. A gift of the German Democratic Republic.
Back of the Berlin Wall Sections. image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, June 13, 2012
5. Back of the Berlin Wall Sections.
The Berlin Wall image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 12, 2013
6. The Berlin Wall
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2012, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 419 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 3, 2012, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   6. submitted on November 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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