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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Appomattox Court House in Appomattox County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Message of Peace”

 
 
"Message of Peace" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. "Message of Peace" Marker
This marker is located at the site of Grant's Headquarters in Appomattox Court House National Historical Park.
Inscription. From near his headquarters atop the rise in front of you, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant sent a message that jolted a nation. After finishing his meeting with Lee at the McLean House, Grant paused along the road and scribbled an unassuming note announcing the surrender (see below). Within hours, the message reached Washington. By midnight bells tolled in celebration throughout the North.

Amidst the small gathering of tents here, General Grant spent his last night in the field. The next day he departed for Washington, D.C., leaving details of the Confederate surrender to a group of military commissioners. The defeat of Lee’s army had required eleven months of constant toil, bloodshed, and death. But the job was done; Grant left Appomattox Court House a national hero.
 
Erected by Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 37° 22.39′ N, 78° 49.014′ W. Marker is near Appomattox Court House, Virginia, in Appomattox County. Marker is on Virginia Route 24, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, near the western entrance to the park. Marker is in this post office area: Appomattox VA 24522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Grant's Headquarters Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
2. Grant's Headquarters Site
The field near the "Message of Peace" marker was where Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant made his headquarters while in Appomattox Court House.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Grant’s Pursuit (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Appomattox Station (a few steps from this marker); Education in 1800's Rural Virginia (approx. 0.6 miles away); Raine Cemetery and Monument (approx. 0.6 miles away); North Carolina (approx. 0.7 miles away); Confederate Artillery Position (approx. 0.8 miles away); Walker's Last Stand (approx. 0.8 miles away); A Strategic Delay (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Appomattox Court House.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker is a picture of Grant writing the “Message of Peace” while one staff member looks on and another is summoning a courier.

At the bottom left of the marker is a picture of the message with the caption ‘The “Message of Peace” included no exultation, no gloating. Its straightforward approach typified the manner of its author – the architect of victory – Ulysses S. Grant.’
 
Also see . . .  Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. (Submitted on March 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Grant's Headquarters image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
3. Grant's Headquarters
Site where Grant informed the country of Lee's surrender.
"Message of Peace" image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
4. "Message of Peace"
This picture of Grant's "Message of Peace" is on the lower left of the marker.
Wilbur McLean House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
5. Wilbur McLean House
This house was the site of the meeting between Gen. U.S. Grant and Gen. R.E. Lee. Here Grant accepted Lee's surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia.
Grant's desk in the McLean House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
6. Grant's desk in the McLean House
Gen. Ulysses S. Grant signed the surrender documents on this table.
Lee's desk in McLean House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
7. Lee's desk in McLean House
On this table, Gen. Robert E. Lee signed the surrender of his Army of Northern Virginia.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,409 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on March 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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